A guide to hate symbols at the Capitol riots


Roberto Schmidt/AFP

The sweatshirt, spotted amid the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol, seemed designed to provoke fear.

“Camp Auschwitz,” it read, along with the message “Work brings freedom” — a rough translation of the message that greeted Jewish prisoners at the infamous Nazi concentration camp.

The back of the shirt said “Staff.”

A photo of the man wearing the sweatshirt was just one of the images of hateful symbols that have circulated from the mob, whose violence led to four deaths and wreaked havoc on Congress. Confederate flags and nooses were among the overt hate signs that the insurrection brought into the Capitol…

Other slogans — on flags, clothing or signs — were code for a gamut of conspiracy theories and extremist ideologies. Here’s what you need to know about them and the far-right movements they represent.

Click the link up top, first two words of this post, and carry on through the entire piece. Many of you may know of the detail and depth of Nazi arrogance these criminals embrace. My peers in movements against racism, bigotry, fighting for international peace…never forget. Some of you may need to learn.

It’s been about 50 years since I visited Auschwitz. An international memorial, now, to the millions, who died at the hands of fascist Germany. I was there with a woman a couple decades older than me. Her husband, her two sons, were murdered there. She escaped to the Soviet Union – and then courageously went back into Poland, into the Underground Resistance, to help organize more escapes from that pit of death and torture.

One of the bravest people I’ve ever known.

A Reuters photographer at Trump’s failed coup attempt

Leah Millis, a senior photographer for Reuters, was one of the journalists capturing events on the ground. She took over 1,000 photos that day, including a striking shot of the Capitol’s exterior. At dusk, a police flash-bang munition went off, casting a warm orange glow on the facade and silhouetting rioters with unfurled Trump flags on the platform below—the same platform used for inaugurations. At that moment, Millis clicked her shutter

Millis started her day at around 11 a.m. ET on the east side of the Capitol, where protesters gathered in the morning. But after receiving a message that rioters were attempting to breach the west side a few hours later, she ran to document the scene, afraid that police would block it off and she wouldn’t get access…

Millis recalls hearing the crowd “chanting some kind of encouragement and realized they were probably breaking into the doors.” She climbed onto some of the scaffolding that’s set up for Inauguration Day to see what was going on. “That’s when I saw them battling with the police for an extended period of time,” she says. “It wasn’t until a different force showed up that they started firing flash-bangs and tear gas to actually disperse the crowd. And that’s what that photo is. The flash-bang going off.”

Great photo. Dangerous opportunity. Just like working around gangs and gangsters, photographers covering Trump’s Republican Party now run the risk of their gear smashed…and personal attacks.