How scary-capable deepfakes have become

This video of Tom Cruise is a computer-generated fake.

In a series of tweets, Rachel Tobac, the CEO of SocialProof Security, warns that deepfakes like @deeptomcruise threaten to further erode public trust in a world where media literacy is poor and people already can’t agree on what’s true or false. Like the black and gold dress, where one person might notice giveaways that the Tom Cruise videos are synthesized, another might not know the signs of a fake and swear up and down that they’re real…

“Just because you feel you can personally tell the difference between synthetic & authentic media, it doesn’t mean we’re good to go,” she says. “It matters what the general public believes.”

Like most longtimey geeks, I recognize the many corrupt uses to which this class of software will be dedicated. Guaranteed. But, I count on…

1. Equally talented geeks coming up with software which will detect and label the criminal and political productions waiting in the wings.

2. Responsible types will publicize the fakes as such…and identify and expose the creepier flavor of geeks out there willing to participate in criminal abuse of advances in technology.

Still – use at your own risk!

Last October, security researchers warned that the Qiui Cellmate Chastity Cage had a serious security flaw that could allow hackers to turn a chastity device into a dick jail. Now, the device’s European distributors are saying the problem’s been fixed and your dicks are safe.

In an email to Gizmodo, a spokesperson from Dusedo—Cellmate’s distributor—wrote that our initial coverage caused consumers to be wary of the device and that such concern was unfounded as it “wrongly created the image that our product could be hacked, after which the genitals of the wearer would be permanently locked up.” The spokesperson went on to elaborate that the problem was with the Qiui app, which had an API security flaw, and not the device itself, but that “because one is inextricably linked to the other, we have, in collaboration with Qiui, made every effort to solve the security issue as quickly as possible.” A nearly word-for-word statement was also sent to Motherboard.

A few folks – no one really knows how many – have paid extortionist geeks to have these devices removed. Paying to have this hardware removed from their “software”. Scary stuff!