Growing Marijuana in a vertical farm


Jean Chung/Bloomberg

South Korean startup Farm 8 Co. is among a proliferation of indoor urban growers that saw sales jump during Covid-19. It’s looking to increase sales by almost 50% to 90 billion won ($79 million) this year, partly by boosting production of medical and cosmetic-based plants such as ginseng, centella asiatica and artemisia campestris, Chief Executive Officer Kang Dae Hyun said. In August, the company joined the country’s first regulation-free zone for medical cannabis, growing and processing hemp for cannabidiol (CBD)…

Other vertical farms are also using the technology to meet rising demand for stringent quality control in medical and cosmetic applications, such as Denmark’s International Cosmetics Science Centre, Poland’s Vertigo Farms and California-based MedMen Enterprises…

Farm 8 currently grows about 1.2 tons of salad greens per day on less than an acre (0.5 hectare) of land, spread across locations in three cities in South Korea, including in a busy subway station in South Korea’s capital. It’s one of the top local lettuce producers for fast-food chains including Subway Restaurants, Burger King Corp. and KFC Corp. Sales rose 30% last year…

South Korea became the first country in East Asia to legalize cannabis for medical use in 2018, and in August 2020, the government set up a free trade zone for industrial hemp in the southeastern city of Andong to develop and extract cannabidiol for medical use with private companies. Marijuana remains illegal for recreational use in the country.

Just like the culture wars here in the GOUSA, the political powers-that-be in South Korea are sidling up to legalizing weed across the board. And like the candyass pols running things here, agonizing over electoral politics with a last century outlook is more important than medical and scientific reality.

I suppose the traditional relationship of cash over Christianity will continue to win out, albeit slowly. The legal weed bill here in New Mexico passed through the representative side of our state legislature and is sitting and waiting for action on the Senate side. The average glacier moves forward faster than so many “modern” political institutions.

7 thoughts on “Growing Marijuana in a vertical farm

  1. Bilagáana says:

    “Pine Ridge or Bust : Even as Dineh Benally’s illegal cannabis operations in the Navajo Nation are under ongoing investigation, he’s looking for more opportunities across Indian Country.” https://searchlightnm.org/pine-ridge-or-bust/
    Last year, Dineh Benally, the former president of San Juan River Farm Board in the Navajo Nation, oversaw the transformation of 400 acres of cropland into illegal marijuana farms across the Shiprock chapter in the northeast corner of the reservation. Despite a state, federal and tribal crackdown on the operation, multiple sources told Searchlight New Mexico and High Country News that he is attempting to establish new cannabis ventures in other Native communities. A source confirmed the same to Navajo Times.

    Navajo Times: “Benally banned from Pine Ridge” https://navajotimes.com/reznews/benally-banned-from-pine-ridge/
    As Shiprock and the Navajo Nation continue to clean up the mess Benally left after months of cultivating 57,950 pounds of hemp and alleged marijuana valued at approximately $1.8 billion, members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe are reporting that Benally has been on their reservation trying to do the same thing.

  2. Supply & Demand says:

    High anxiety over federal weed loophole https://www.politico.com/news/2021/03/27/rise-of-delta-8-thc-478215
    Delta-8 THC is an isomer of Delta-9 THC, the compound responsible for marijuana’s intoxicating effects. That means the two are largely the same compound, with slight atomic differences. The vast majority of Delta-8 products aren’t extracted from cannabis. Instead, producers convert plant-derived CBD into Delta-8 THC using a chemical process called isomerization. The process combines CBD with a solvent, acid and heat to cause the reaction that turns CBD into THC.
    When Congress passed the 2018 farm bill legalizing hemp, it was eager to distinguish the crop from marijuana. Hemp and marijuana are the same species of plant, cannabis sativa L., but hemp can’t contain more than 0.3 percent THC. The distinction is legal, not scientific.
    The DEA declined to comment on the legality of Delta-8 until it finalizes its hemp interim final rule. “We are in the process of reviewing thousands of comments and do not speculate on what could happen as a result,” a spokesperson for the DEA said.
    …The CBD boom of last year led to plummeting prices and a huge glut of CBD isolate in the hemp industry. The Delta-8 trend is giving “processors an outlet for large inventories of CBD isolate they built up,” said Ian Laird, chief financial officer at Hemp Benchmarks.
    It’s attractive for processors and retailers alike as the compound is more profitable than CBD. In January, Delta-8 cost about $1,400 per kilogram, while CBD isolate was selling for about $550 per kilogram.

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