56,000 voters on Earth’s largest island may change global access to rare earth metals

Last month, Greenland’s coalition government collapsed amid an ongoing row over a new rare earth and uranium mine…As resource geopolitics become even more contentious, April’s snap election could be a turning point for the remote Arctic nation.

Among the lofty dramatics of geopolitics, international observers now find themselves paying attention to the operation of a tiny democracy of 56,000 people, most of it conducted in Greenlandic, and the rest in Danish…

Greenland’s status can be hard to pin down. It is an autonomous territory within the Kingdom of Denmark, free to and keen to develop further its independence from the Danes, yet constrained by its reliance on them for roughly half of its annual budget. Greenland’s citizens, mostly Inuit, are entitled to take over any of the many responsibilities currently fulfilled by Copenhagen—which include immigration, shipping, and some aspects of foreign policy—on the condition that they pick up the cost as well. Full independence is a constitutionally enshrined option, so long as it receives popular backing in a referendum…

The development of one mine site, at Kuannersuit, has had a remarkable and telling effect on Greenland’s politics in the past six months. Kuannersuit would be “the world’s second-biggest rare-earth operation and fifth-biggest uranium mine,” according to the new report. It lies less than 6 miles from the town of Narsaq, whose 1,300 inhabitants make it the country’s ninth-largest settlement. Many of them are not satisfied with plans to store radioactive waste behind a dam, or to spray the ground with water to prevent radioactive dust from spreading throughout the area.

The whole article is fascinating with shifting definitions changing by the month it seems. RTFA and get ready for the election in April.