Preparing cicadas every 17 years

While snacking on a cicada may not be your idea of a delicious treat, they’re high in protein, low-fat, low-carb, gluten-free and, over the course of the next several weeks, will be plentiful and fairly easy to forage. The clock is ticking, though.

Jenna Jadin, an entomologist who wrote “Cicada-Licious,” the definitive cicada cookbook in 2004, says the bugs are best to eat shortly after they’ve hatched, before their exoskeletons have hardened. Early morning is the ideal time to catch them. Cicadas with hardened shells should be boiled before eating. Never forage cicadas that are already dead.

So, how do they taste? Bon Appetit says cicadas are similar to soft-shell crab, “but with subtle overtones of boiled peanuts, the kind only a backroads gas station can really do right.”

RTFA. Try it! I did…34 years ago back East. My friends who did the catching and cooking did pretty much Wild Food Italian 101 using good extra virgin olive oil and garlic chunks to wok fry ’em…like one of the recipes in this article.

4 thoughts on “Preparing cicadas every 17 years

  1. p/s says:

    Crayfish are eaten all over the world. Like other edible crustaceans, only a small portion of the body of a crayfish is edible. In most prepared dishes, such as soups, bisques and étouffées, only the tail portion is served. At crawfish boils or other meals where the entire body of the crayfish is presented, other portions, such as the claw meat, may be eaten.
    Claws of larger boiled specimens are often pulled apart to access the meat inside. Another favorite is to suck the head of the crayfish, as seasoning and flavor can collect in the fat of the boiled interior. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crayfish_as_food#China

  2. Mark says:

    You could feed a family of four on some of the cicadas over here.

    I was one my motorbike once when one hove into view like a Mi-Mi 26. Managed to lodge itself up under the chin guard of the full face helmet and right next to my ear.g.

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