Don’t worry about a thing

Big Apple update night. Not only our iPhones and iPads; our AppleTV 4K, our Macs, as well. And the WordPress software on this – my MacBook Air – has hundreds of posts. Just about every one has a illustration of some kind.

In a day or so it will all repopulate. That includes all the cartoons from gocomics.org … Check back in, tomorrow morning. Might even be a bit longer; but, push comes to shove, I’ll get a post done for Tuesday morning, the 27th … without a graphic if need be.

🙂

FBI now has authority to access corporate computers without owners’ knowledge or consent


<–The only Feds I trust

The FBI has the authority right now to access privately owned computers without their owners’ knowledge or consent, and to delete software. It’s part of a government effort to contain the continuing attacks on corporate networks running Microsoft Exchange software, and it’s an unprecedented intrusion that’s raising legal questions about just how far the government can go.

On April 9, the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas approved a search warrant allowing the U.S. Department of Justice to carry out the operation.

The software the FBI is deleting is malicious code installed by hackers to take control of a victim’s computer. Hackers have used the code to access vast amounts of private email messages and to launch ransomware attacks. The authority the Justice Department relied on and the way the FBI carried out the operation set important precedents. They also raise questions about the power of courts to regulate cybersecurity without the consent of the owners of the targeted computers.

Have we reached one of those dream-state moments when lawyers and judges rollover, stick all four feet in the air and declare “oh, what a good boy am I!” … just for being obedient and unthinking?

New Coppers often teamed with crap coppers. Guess what they learn?


YOU GUESSED IT! HOW TO BE CRAP COPPERS.

Police in the United States receive less initial training than their counterparts in other rich countries—about five months in a classroom and another three or so months in the field, on average. Many European nations, meanwhile, have something more akin to police universities, which can take three or four years to complete. European countries also have national standards for various elements of a police officer’s job—such as how to search a car and when to use a baton. The U.S. does not.

The 18,000 police departments in the U.S. each have their own rules and requirements. But although police reform is a contentious subject, the inadequacy of the current training provides a rare point of relative consensus: “Police officers, police chiefs, and everyone agree that we do not get enough training in a myriad of fields,” Dennis Slocumb, the legislative director of the International Union of Police Associations, told me…

…Few American officers receive much education about the history of policing or the role of police in a democratic society. “The officer coming out of one of the European training programs, he’s much more likely to have a much broader perspective on what the job is, what your role is, what your society is like, how do you fit into it,” says David Harris, a law professor at the University of Pittsburgh. “Those things are just not really part of what’s going on in most American police-training programs.”…

New officers are often paired with field-training officers, but many of those officers learned the wrong techniques themselves, and are passing them along to their trainees. Derek Chauvin, who was convicted on Tuesday of murder, was acting as a field-training officer when he killed George Floyd. Kim Potter, who shouted “Taser! Taser! Taser!” before fatally shooting Daunte Wright with her pistol last week, was also acting as a field-training officer at the time.

I think you get the idea. It makes a great deal of sense [to me] that folks who are actually trained to be professionals, meeting recognized standards of behavior…will turn out to be police professionals more often than not. That might even be a more useful place to spend tax dollars than urban assault tanks. Or picking up the tab for defending cops who murder civilians.