In 2017, the Broadband Industry funded “fake grassroots support” to end Net Neutrality


Trump’s tame FCC Chairman, Ajit Pai

The largest Internet providers in the US funded a campaign that generated “8.5 million fake comments” to the Federal Communications Commission as part of the ISPs’ fight against net neutrality rules during the Trump administration, according to a report issued…by New York State Attorney General Letitia James.

Nearly 18 million out of 22 million comments were fabricated, including both pro- and anti-net neutrality submissions, the report said. One 19-year-old submitted 7.7 million pro-net neutrality comments under fake, randomly generated names. But the astroturfing effort funded by the broadband industry stood out because it used real people’s names without their consent, with third-party firms hired by the industry faking consent records

It was clear before Pai completed the repeal in December 2017 that millions of people—including dead people—were impersonated in net neutrality comments. Even industry-funded research found that 98.5 percent of genuine comments opposed Pai’s deregulatory plan. But [the] report reveals more details about how many comments were fake and how the broadband industry was involved.

“The broadband industry could not, in fact, rely on grassroots support for its campaign because the public overwhelmingly supported robust net neutrality rules,” the report noted. “So the broadband industry tried to manufacture support for repeal by hiring companies to generate comments for a fee.”

This article from arstechnica is damned good at presenting the case against corrupt companies, corrupt politicians and those who aided their cover-up. Want ALL the details? Go to the report filed by the NY State AG, Letitia James.

Finding it Hard to Hire? Try Raising Your Wages

By Barry Ritholtz

…The obvious question “Why are Job Openings so hard to fill?”…

If the Demand for workers is there, why hasn’t the supply caught up yet? The short answer is Price. Employers have been reluctant to raise wages. This is classic problem where buyers and sellers get anchored on some past level, failing to keep up with the realities of markets.

The old trader cliché “More Buyers than Sellers” often omits the phrase “at this price level.” For any trade to occur there must always be at least one seller for each buyer (and vice versa); once there are no more sellers at a specific price level, if you want to find more stock for sale, you must look at higher price levels.

After several decades of lagging prices for low wage labor, I believe what we are witnessing is something very similar. THERE IS NO MORE LABOR FOR SALE AT $7/HOUR; so the price moves up. Once it moves up high enough so that supply matches with demand, you get a stabilization at that level…

Want to hire qualified candidates who will fill jobs, generate revenue, create profits, and lower your overall cost structure? Perhaps you should consider offering higher starting wages.

Barry Ritholtz doesn’t waste time or space on any of the penny-ante analyses offered up all over mass media. A fair piece of the crap reasoning offered up online and in print isn’t so cheap, either.

Just RTFA. This was the lead in his newsletter, today. Barry maintains his dedication to telling the truth as he sees it.