We’ll be back, tomorrow, Saturday, mid-day

Completely nutso afternoon and evening …expecting one new piece of digital hardware to be delivered of several on the way – and three arrived. And, of course, there was a software problem with the most important piece. Which I just resolved; but, now, I’m brain-dead and need a bunch of sleep.

See y’all mid-morning or a touch later.

Ed

Among other upgrades throughout our networked life at Lot 4. I decided to return to a proper desktop in our home office. Much to my dismay, I learned Apple no longer offers a 21″ iMac. So, here’s a snap of the 24″ beastie sitting on my desk. Actually works out OK for projects needing graphics here and there, notes to myself on projects, etc..

I’ve used larger BITD; and I didn’t trade-in my laptop. It’s moved to the living room along with other new [and not so new] goodies. Wiped out my next couple of SSA checks, though.

Indigenous forest gardens still productive after 100 years


Chelsey Armstrong

…In the last few decades, archeologists have learned that perennial forest management—the creation and care of long-lived food-bearing shrubs and plants next to forests—was common among the Indigenous societies of North America’s northwestern coast. The forest gardens played a central role in the diet and stability of these cultures in the past, and now a new publication shows that they offer an example of a far more sustainable and biodiverse alternative to conventional agriculture.

This research, which was done in collaboration with the Tsm’syen and Coast Salish First Nations, shows that the gardens have become lasting hotspots of biodiversity, even 150 years after colonists forcibly removed the inhabitants from their villages. This work, combining archeology, botany, and ecology, is the first to systematically study the long-term ecological effects of Indigenous peoples’ land use in the region. The gardens offer ideas for farming practices that might restore, rather than deplete, local resources to create healthier, more resilient ecosystems…

By comparing the gardens to the neighboring forests, the researchers’ results clearly showed that the gardens had a much higher species and functional diversity. In addition, the gardens frequently showed a carefully overlapped structure, with a canopy of fruit and nut trees, a mid-layer of berries, and roots and herbs in the undergrowth. Thanks to the increased availability of fruit, nuts, and other edible plants, these places also supported local wildlife, such as moose, bears, and deer.

“There’s a kind of false dichotomy debate going on right now that biodiversity is at odds with food production, and what we see here is very clearly that it’s not,” said Armstrong. “Forest gardens are one of the examples of how you can get multiple species occupying multiple niche spaces—there are all sorts of ecological lessons there.”

We could compare cultural diversity if the Anglos moving into the region hadn’t decided it was in their best interest to remove the people who had been living there for centuries. Often by force.

That history is also part of this article.