Most inspiring event I ever saw on TV

Four weeks later, I was co-chairman of a newly-chartered chapter of C.O.R.E., the Congress Of Racial Equality. The other co-chair, a Black man named Frank, was a machine operator in an aircraft engine factory. I was working in a warehouse. We both lived and worked in a factory town in Southern New England.

We marched forward. Never looked back.

John Salter, a social science professor at Tougaloo College, sat with his students Anne Moody, Pearlena Lewis and Memphis Norman–a white man and three black students–at the “Whites Only” counter in Woolworth’s store lunch counter. Nobody would serve them. Behind them was a growing crowd of frenzied onlookers, police officers and news people. It was 11:15 a.m. on May 28, 1963.

#Bill Minor, then a reporter for the New Orleans Times-Picayune, was there that day. He was the Mississippi correspondent covering civil rights events in Jackson and the state. Minor, tipped off by Medgar Evers, gathered with the other news people at the planned sit-in and watched the scene unfold.

Please read the article. Learn something about American history. This was not an isolated incident. Fightback had been going on since the first slave escaped. The racism that was part and parcel of justifying slavery lasted decades and centuries beyond the inhumane economics that justified the lies.

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