17 thoughts on “Even if no one else pays you any attention…

  1. Tao says:

    “Everything that you need to know about reading, making, and understanding comics can be found in a single Nancy strip by Ernie Bushmiller from August 8, 1959. Paul Karasik and Mark Newgarden’s groundbreaking work How to Read Nancy ingeniously isolates the separate building blocks of the language of comics through the deconstruction of a single strip. No other book on comics has taken such a simple yet methodical approach to laying bare how the comics medium really works.” Google books https://books.google.com/books/about/How_to_Read_Nancy.html?id=FrivDgAAQBAJ&source=kp_book_description

  2. Comic books says:

    ‘Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story’ is a 16-page comic book about Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and the Montgomery bus boycott published in 1957 by the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR USA). It advocates the principles of nonviolence and provides a primer on nonviolent resistance.
    Although ignored by the mainstream comics industry, The Montgomery Story was widely distributed among civil rights groups, churches, and schools. It helped inspire nonviolent protest movements around the Southern United States, and later in Latin America, South Africa, the Middle East, and elsewhere. Over 50 years after its initial publication, the comic inspired the best-selling, award-winning March trilogy by Georgia Congressman John Lewis.
    …Cartoonist Al Capp was an admirer of Dr. King; his studio produced Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story at no charge.”
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Luther_King_and_the_Montgomery_Story
    The March trilogy is an autobiographical black and white graphic novel trilogy about the Civil rights movement, told through the perspective of civil rights leader and U.S. Congressman John Lewis. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_(comics)

  3. Gertie says:

    A thagomizer (/ˈθæɡəmaɪzər/) is the distinctive arrangement of four spikes on the tails of stegosaurine dinosaurs. These spikes are believed to have been a defensive measure against predators.
    The arrangement of spikes originally had no distinct name; cartoonist Gary Larson invented the name “thagomizer” in 1982 as a joke in his comic strip The Far Side, and it was gradually adopted as an informal term used within scientific circles, research, and education. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thagomizer

    The Thagomizer: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/65/Thagomizer.png

  4. Pen & ink says:

    “Ink-stained genius: Film reexamines cartoonist Bill Mauldin” https://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/legislature/ink-stained-genius-film-reexamines-cartoonist-bill-mauldin/article_61d960be-885c-11ec-8768-679d2374eb16.html
    “William Henry Mauldin (1921~2003) was an American editorial cartoonist who won two Pulitzer Prizes for his work. He was most famous for his World War II cartoons depicting American soldiers, as represented by the archetypal characters Willie and Joe.”

    • eideard says:

      Mauldin was idolized in my extended family…as he was by most enlisted men. During the war, both sides of my family matched or exceeded the national average of military casualties. War stories remain a thread in my family…including the later resisters to military service in more traditional imperial wars that followed WW2.

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