Israelis destroying historic Muslim cemetery to build a park


Ahmad Gharabli/AFP

A few metres away from the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound’s eastern walls lies the centuries-old Al-Yousufiya Cemetery, also known as the Bab al-Asbat (Lion’s Gate) Cemetery.

Over the past few weeks, videos and images of Palestinians clinging to their family members’ graves as Israeli forces arrest, beat, and attempt to forcibly pull them away have widely circulated on social media.

Israeli occupation authorities in Jerusalem have been moving ahead with plans to build a Jewish “national park” set to open in mid-2022 over parts of the cemetery, which spans more than 14 dunams (1.4 hectares) of land.

Three weeks ago, workers from the Israeli-controlled Jerusalem municipality and the Israel Nature and Parks Authority exposed human remains during excavations, causing outrage and unleashing continuous protests and prayers at the site.

Since then, Palestinians have been increasing their presence at the graveyard, including those going to protect their dead, and confronting Israeli forces, which responded with tear gas, stun grenades, physical beatings, arrests, temporary bans on individuals from visiting the cemetery.

People may debate whether the Israeli forces are committing a sin or a crime. No matter what you call this, it must stop. Since the political clown show in Washington is the major prop to the Israeli government, communicating rejection of this ongoing desecration to our own elected officials is worth doing. If for nothing else – a call for justice.

CEO of Spanx sells majority stake in her company. Celebrates with employees.


Paul Morigi/Getty

Before Spanx founder Sara Blakely became the youngest self-made female billionaire, she sold fax machines door to door because she needed the money and health insurance.

Now, two decades after Blakely launched the pioneering womenswear company, global investment firm Blackstone is buying a majority stake in Spanx, which is valued at an estimated $1.2 billion in the deal.

In a video posted on Instagram last week, Blakely celebrated the sale with her employees. A globe sat on a nearby table, and eventually she asked: “Why am I spinning a globe?”

Then, before the quiet crowd, she announced the reason: because she has bought two first-class tickets — to anywhere in the world — for each employee.

But that wasn’t all.

“You know, if you have a trip, you might want to go out to a really nice dinner, you might want to go out to a really nice hotel,” Blakely said. “So with everybody’s two first-class tickets to anywhere in the world, you are each getting $10,000.”

I can say with no worry of being contradicted, I never worked for any company in the United States where there was the slightest chance of anything like this happening.