#Goyaway trending after Goya CEO says we’re “blessed” with Trump

Goya…is facing a backlash after its chief executive met with and heaped praise on President Donald Trump at the White House on Thursday.

On Twitter, #BoycottGoya and #GoyaFoods were trending in the United States, and some Latinos were also using the hashtag #goyaway…

The remark set off a wave of criticism of New Jersey-based Goya, founded in 1936 by European immigrants. Some called for consumers to consider other brands in the canned food aisle.

Americans should think twice before buying their products,” former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro tweeted.

That smug bigot in the White House has no trouble rallying support from a Tío Tomás. We had one can of something-or-other Goya in the pantry, We fed it to our dog. I hope she doesn’t get sick.

Western Farm Life — 1940


Click to enlargeFarm family after evening meal. Pie Town, New Mexico.
Photo by Russell Lee for the Farm Security Administration. October, 1940.

A lovely historic photo. A wonderful example of why so many contemporary photographers prefer to return to black-and-white.

4 ways our eating habits have changed since the 1930s


Breadline, New York City, Xmas Day, 1931

Food was the single largest expenditure for families in the early 1930s, amounting to about a quarter of family spending…Today that number is lower, despite an increase in dining out; food expenditures amounted to about 10% of families’ disposable personal incomes in 2014…

In 1933, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt approved a plan to create the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, which gave federal grants to states, who used the funds to distribute relief including food to U.S. families.

I’ll list the 4 categories of change wrought during Depression years:

1. The government took an active role in educating people about food

2. Bland foods were in

3. Cow’s milk was a ‘wonder food’

4. ‘Farm-to-table’ was the opposite of trendy

You get the idea; but, the review provokes a lot of interest. Some is pretty easy for geezers as old as me. Some will likely be surprising to folks whose knowledge of the Great Depression derives from romantic sources. No one in the family left to relate their personal tales.

And…the comments are worth wandering through. My favorite, so far…talking about the food being bland…“Too bad Phyllis Schlafly never wrote a cookbook. It’d give us something to laugh about.

Cooking with Phyllis:

Hello Ladies and Gentlemen. Today we’re going to be cooking with water. I’m going to show you how to make one of my favorite dishes: boiled liver.”

Har!

Thank you, thank you, King Arthur

Received my order of 2-5# bags of bread flour – drop-shipped from Kansas – at just the right time. Poolish inside the bowl of my mixer just finished bubbling its overnight prep for baking when I saw the FedEx truck roll into the driveway. My flour bucket shy of what was needed to bake bread for the week.

Great fortune to be dealing with an old Yankee, employee-owned company, that takes care of its customers.

Baking your own bread — rules!

Thanks, gocomics.org

Bread bakers can disagree even when they’re on the same side. I never add sugar to my “poolish” or the completed recipe…flour, water, yeast, a little salt. Which I generally age in the fridge 2-5 days before shaping, rising and baking. BTW, the dough in my household – ready to shape and bake – is called “Jabba”.

Everyone’s drug of choice

Four hundred years ago, Coffea arabica, a tropical shrub bearing glossy green leaves and bright-red berries, was virtually unknown outside of the Arab world and the corner of Ethiopia where it had been discovered in the ninth century—by a goatherd who, legend has it, noticed that his animals would get frisky and stay up all night after nibbling its berries. In the years since…we have given it more than 27 million acres of new habitat all around the world, assigned 25 million farming families to its care and feeding, and bid up its price until it became one of the most valuable globally traded crops…

Coffee owes its global ascendancy to a fortuitous evolutionary accident: The chemical compound that the plant makes to defend itself against insects happens to alter human consciousness in ways we find desirable, making us more energetic and industrious—and notably better workers. That chemical of course is caffeine, which is now the world’s most popular psychoactive drug, used daily by 80 percent of humanity. (It is the only such drug we routinely give to our children, in the form of soda.) Along with the tea plant, which produces the same compound in its leaves, coffee has helped create exactly the kind of world that coffee needs to thrive: a world driven by consumer capitalism, ringed by global trade, and dominated by a species that can now barely get out of bed without its help.

I love it.

Sunday morning grocery shopping

So…Sunday morning is for grocery shopping in our house. We have a pickup appointment in a few days at Walmart. Yes, they’re going crazy, already. We knew Trader Joe wouldn’t be open until 9AM…they had a sign up, last week, announcing the change for restocking time.

We arrived about 5 minutes before opening time. Crap! Parking lot full. The line to the entrance was about 2 blocks long. What can you do? We joined onto the end of the line. No one stood very close to the person ahead.

Once the door opened, the line moved a bunch – then stopped. After 10 minutes of nothing, we resumed moving, slow and steady. When we reached the entrance, we learned why. They were limiting the number of folks shopping to 50. Someone leaves, their cart is wiped down when returned. Back at the entrance, you were handed over to another already-shiny cart and allowed in.

Frankly, it worked smoothly. Shopping wasn’t any longer than usual. Got the TJ portion of our grocery list and out the door. And when I brought the cart back to the lineup, the important thing I noticed was that the line was holding at only several shoppers down to none. Next week, we’ll time it to arrive a hour later.

🙂

Attaboy, TJ! Feels like you got it right on.

Kimbal Musk is a Brooklyn farmer…

HIS NEW FARM WILL BE INSIDE 25 SHIPPING CONTAINERS


Atsalottabasil!

Vertical farming is an indoor farming method in which crops are grown in stacked layers, often without soil. The practice is becoming more popular and important as urban populations grow dramatically and available farmland decreases….While vertical farming isn’t a new concept, these eco-friendly indoor farms are now rapidly expanding.

Elon Musk’s younger brother, Kimbal Musk, who was named “Global Social Entrepreneur” of the year by the World Economic Forum in 2017, started Square Roots, an indoor urban farming company based in Brooklyn, in 2016. Square Roots’ mission is to bring fresh, local food to cities around the world by empowering younger generations to participate in urban farming.

Musk said the company plans to open a Square Roots “Super Farm” — with 25 climate-controlled shipping containers, cold storage, biosecurity infrastructure and everything else needed to run a vertical farm at scale — in less than three months…

“Environmentalists, urban farmers, architects, agronomists, and public health experts, among others, have been joining this mini revolution as they partner to work out a way to salvage a food-scarce, ultra-urbanized future,” Kheir Al-Kodmany, a professor of sustainable urban design at the University of Illinois at Chicago, said in a report.

It involves various techniques, such as hydroponics, which uses mineral nutrient solutions in a water solvent; aquaponics, which uses aquatic creatures — such as fish and snails — and cultivates plants in water; and aeroponics, which grows plants in the air.

It works. A fair number of knowledgeable folks believe this can be economically self-sufficient and beneficial.

42 ways to fry an egg


ELLA QUITTNER

I fried 42 eggs in nine different cooking fats and five pan types, to try to arrive at the truth: What is the absolute best way to fry an egg?

Ella Quittner for FOOD52.com

Great read. I have an egg for breakfast 4-5 mornings/week. Soft-boiled, precisely 3-minute egg. With a piece of toast from the loaf I bake every Monday morning mostly just to accompany that egg. The toast is buttered with cultured butter from Belgium. Salted butter; so, no salt added to the egg. Tiny grind of Talicherry black peppercorn.

After reading this article, I might go with fried for a few mornings.