Twinkies aren’t immortal, after all


Left to Right: Deceased – Dying – Want a bite?

Last week, craving sweets, Colin Purrington remembered the Twinkies.

He’d purchased them back in 2012 for sentimental reasons when he heard that Hostess Brands was going bankrupt and Twinkies might disappear forever…

Like many people, Purrington believed Twinkies are basically immortal, although the official shelf life is 45 days. He removed a Twinkie from the box, unwrapped it — it looked fine — and took a bite. Then he retched…

…Researchers immediately thought some kind of fungus was involved in attacking the 8-year-old Twinkies, because they’ve studied fungi that kill insects and dry them out in a similar way. Plus, the reddish blotch on one Twinkie seemed to have a growth pattern that’s typical of fungi.

They reached out to Purrington, who was only too happy to mail them the Twinkies immediately. “Science is a collaborative sport,” he says. “If someone can take this and figure out what was actually growing, I’m all in. I really want to know what species exactly was eating my Twinkies.”

A fun read, unless you’re a big shareholder in whoever owns Twinkies, nowadays. Another addition to the long list of reasons why I don’t eat anything in this category of food I didn’t prepare myself.

World Bread Day

Today is World Bread Day. It’s my usual day to bake a loaf of bread for the next week, as well.

I’m pretty set in my ways. Even though I often experiment one way or another with flour combinations, even the shape…this is pretty much my standard loaf. King Arthur flour, of course. This one happens to be 50/50 blend of their All-Purpose and Bread Flours. A touch more protein than straight AP.

Can’t wait for the first slice toasted with breakfast, tomorrow. But, I shall. 🙂

Making TABASCO Hot Sauce

Entertaining. Even more fun if you love your hot sauce. Like most Americans, I got started consuming hot sauce courtesy of Tabasco. Actually, it was at Mister Johnson’s rib shack at the edge of Seaside Park in Bridgeport…and he offered Tabasco as the topping for his excellent slow-smoked ribs.

I may have the name of his little sidewalk counter spot wrong. We just called it “Mister Johnson’s”. And that was in the mid-1960’s. My memory ain’t that great on a good day. But, I surely remember the taste of those ribs. And hot? Woo hoo!

Search for an “extinct” apple

On a crisp December afternoon, as the sun slowly fell behind the nearby Sawatch Range, Addie and Jude Schuenemeyer stared at a nearly dead tree, a few apples dangling off its last living branch.

“In that moment, I felt hope,” recalls Addie.

But was this moment when the sun finally set on their nearly 20-year hunt for something many long believed was extinct?…

“We’ve documented over 400 varieties of apples historically grown in Colorado, 50% are now considered lost,” says Addie. “The Colorado Orange was one of these.”…

But, they never gave up. This is what they found.

I know how silly this seems; but…

Though I don’t recall the variety’s name, we bought some of these freestone peaches at Trader Joe’s, this morning. This is the first one I cut in half to have after today’s lunch.

What a perfect freestone. The stone fell out after I separated the halves and took this quick iPhoto. Dry stone. Flesh light and barely perfumed with whatever someone may have named this fruit’s flavor. Cut the two halves into sections and then slices. Took lots of time to savor my dessert.

…Thank you, TJ.

Big win for bunkers!

Yeah, I know the video says menhaden. That’s the correct name. But, my sister and I grew up subsistence fishing with our father on the southern New England coast. We saw bunkers cram into our harbors and inlets, every now and then, trying to get away from the big guys who wanted them for a meal in a mouthful.

I will remember to my dying day the one time a killer whale followed a school of bunkers into our favorite harborside spot, early morning on a pier jutting out a quarter-mile from shore. Woo-hoo! Biggest fin I ever saw sticking up through little harbor waves. And when he left after his snack, we just packed up and went home. Even if there were stragglers of any species left, they were too scared to come out and try to eat anything.

#Goyaway trending after Goya CEO says we’re “blessed” with Trump

Goya…is facing a backlash after its chief executive met with and heaped praise on President Donald Trump at the White House on Thursday.

On Twitter, #BoycottGoya and #GoyaFoods were trending in the United States, and some Latinos were also using the hashtag #goyaway…

The remark set off a wave of criticism of New Jersey-based Goya, founded in 1936 by European immigrants. Some called for consumers to consider other brands in the canned food aisle.

Americans should think twice before buying their products,” former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro tweeted.

That smug bigot in the White House has no trouble rallying support from a Tío Tomás. We had one can of something-or-other Goya in the pantry, We fed it to our dog. I hope she doesn’t get sick.

Western Farm Life — 1940


Click to enlargeFarm family after evening meal. Pie Town, New Mexico.
Photo by Russell Lee for the Farm Security Administration. October, 1940.

A lovely historic photo. A wonderful example of why so many contemporary photographers prefer to return to black-and-white.