A mind is a terrible thing to waste…

…especially on a fake president who is also missing honesty, intelligence, respect for human rights, an understanding of basic economics and fairness. Who is followed around by a loyal fan club of voters whose basic political precepts have been formed by so-called reality TV.

Bill Gates is not impressed. Neither was the majority of voters in our last presidential election. Shows you what gerrymandering can accomplish.

#MovingWhileBlack

❝ A black former White House staffer to President Obama had the police called on him for burglary while moving into his new New York City apartment.

The Washington Post reported Tuesday that Darren Martin was moving in on the Upper West Side Friday night when police arrived.

A neighbor called 911 to report that someone who had a weapon or large tool was trying to break in. They complained about someone opening and banging doors.

Martin said he felt he was racially profiled by whoever made the call that caused a half-dozen officers to come and question him…

❝ Martin, who is now working as an aide in the New York City government, said on Twitter that he had a “lingering pit” in his stomach over how his neighbors viewed him…

He used the hashtag #MovingWhileBlack to Tweet the video he originally planned to record moving in and setting up in his new home. Which became a video recording the effects of one or more racist neighbors calling in the cops.

The multiple post at TWITTER is in the article linked to above.

American Racism — Precursor to Hitler

❝ Americans have an especially insatiable appetite for Nazi-themed books, films, television shows, documentaries, video games, and comic books. Stories of the Second World War console us with memories of the days before Vietnam, Cambodia, and Iraq, when the United States was the world’s good-hearted superpower, riding to the rescue of a Europe paralyzed by totalitarianism and appeasement. Yet an eerie continuity became visible in the postwar years, as German scientists were imported to America and began working for their former enemies; the resulting technologies of mass destruction exceeded Hitler’s darkest imaginings. The Nazis idolized many aspects of American society: the cult of sport, Hollywood production values, the mythology of the frontier. From boyhood on, Hitler devoured the Westerns of the popular German novelist Karl May. In 1928, Hitler remarked, approvingly, that white settlers in America had “gunned down the millions of redskins to a few hundred thousand.” When he spoke of Lebensraum, the German drive for “living space” in Eastern Europe, he often had America in mind.

❝ Among recent books on Nazism, the one that may prove most disquieting for American readers is James Q. Whitman’s “Hitler’s American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law” (Princeton). On the cover, the inevitable swastika is flanked by two red stars. Whitman methodically explores how the Nazis took inspiration from American racism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He notes that, in “Mein Kampf,” Hitler praises America as the one state that has made progress toward a primarily racial conception of citizenship, by “excluding certain races from naturalization.” Whitman writes that the discussion of such influences is almost taboo, because the crimes of the Third Reich are commonly defined as “the nefandum, the unspeakable descent into what we often call ‘radical evil.’ ” But the kind of genocidal hatred that erupted in Germany had been seen before and has been seen since. Only by stripping away its national regalia and comprehending its essential human form do we have any hope of vanquishing it.

❝ …In our current age of unapologetic racism and resurgent authoritarianism, the mechanics of Hitler’s rise are a particularly pressing matter. For dismantlers of democracy, there is no better exemplar.

Often pedantic, sometimes dry, always factual – which is why conservatives ranging from Holocaust deniers to Trumplicans will hate this article as much as they hate the whole history of the fight for civil rights in America..

Don’t Let Fascism Go ‘Unnoticed Until It’s Too Late’

❝ Madeleine Albright’s new book, Fascism: A Warning, starts by describing how Hitler and Mussolini came to power in the 20th century, then warns about today’s authoritarian rulers in Eastern Europe, North Korea, Turkey and Russia.

Albright, who was born in Czechoslovakia and fled with her family after the Nazis occupied the country in 1939, notes that the United States has traditionally been viewed as a nation that opposes authoritarianism and supports democratic principles and human rights, but that perception is changing — in part because of President Trump.

While Albright does not call Trump a fascist, she says that he is “the most anti-democratic leader that I have studied in American history.”

❝ Part of the reason for writing [the book] is to say that, in fact, this can happen in countries that have democratic systems, that have a population that’s interested in what’s going on, that is supportive. … That’s what’s so worrisome, is that fascism can come in a way that it is one step at a time, and in many ways, goes unnoticed until it’s too late.

If there’s anyone in a leading role in American politics who obviously couldn’t care less about democracy vs fascism – it’s our fake president. This is a legitimate concern.

Why Black Worshipers Are Leaving White Evangelical Churches

❝ In the last couple of decades, there had been signs, however modest, that eleven o’clock on Sunday morning might cease to be the most segregated hour in America. “Racial reconciliation” was the talk of conferences and the subject of formal resolutions. Large Christian ministries were dedicated to the aim of integration, and many black Christians decided to join white-majority congregations. Some went as missionaries, called by God to integrate. Others were simply drawn to a different worship style — short, conveniently timed services that emphasized a personal connection to God…

Black congregants — as recounted by people in Chicago, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Fort Worth and elsewhere — had already grown uneasy in recent years as they watched their white pastors fail to address police shootings of African-Americans. They heard prayers for Paris, for Brussels, for law enforcement; they heard that one should keep one’s eyes on the kingdom, that the church was colorblind, and that talk of racial injustice was divisive, not a matter of the gospel. There was still some hope that this stemmed from an obliviousness rather than some deeper disconnect.

Then white evangelicals voted for Mr. Trump by a larger margin than they had voted for any presidential candidate. They cheered the outcome, reassuring uneasy fellow worshipers with talk of abortion and religious liberty, about how politics is the art of compromise rather than the ideal. Christians of color, even those who shared these policy preferences, looked at Mr. Trump’s comments about Mexican immigrants, his open hostility to N.F.L. players protesting police brutality and his earlier “birther” crusade against President Obama, claiming falsely he was not a United States citizen. In this political deal, many concluded, they were the compromised.

What’s important to many white evangelicals obviously ain’t the words they declare to be holy writ. Politics of religion can be just as opportunist as any other.