Oz Judge Rules Farting at Your Employees Isn’t Bullying

❝ An Australian appeals court on Friday dismissed a bullying case brought by an engineer who accused his former supervisor of repeatedly breaking wind toward him.

The Victoria state court of appeal upheld a supreme court judge’s ruling that even if engineer David Hingst’s allegations were true, flatulence did not necessarily constitute bullying…

❝ He had sought $1.8m in a suit against his former employer Construction Engineering, but a judge blasted the case out of the supreme court last year.

Hingst applied to appeal the case, saying “flatulence was a form of bullying” and his ex-colleague Greg Short was a serial farter…

❝ The court of appeal ruled against Hingst on Friday, refusing to grant him leave to appeal and ordering him to pay the defendant’s legal costs…

In response, Hingst promised to take the case further. “I’m taking it to the high court,” he told the judges.

I worked at a firm for a short while where there actually was a similar struggle. El Primo used to think it was funny to sneak up behind this one employee and drop a blue bomber fierce enough that even folks a desk or two away had to get up and move.

The final confrontation was classic, though. The target dude had made up his mind to quit. Had another job lined up. Now, one thing consistent about the boss was that he always had to dash into the men’s room and variously relieve himself as soon as he arrived at work. Don’t know what he had for breakfast; but, it was “active”.

Our victim arrived early his last day before leaving – smiling and looking a little cramped. He’d eaten a very early breakfast of anchovies and hard-boiled eggs and topped it off with a can of beans stewed with prunes. He managed to stay out of our little one-holer office crapper till he spotted the man himself pull into the parking lot. Ran into the bathroom, locking himself in – followed by thunderous thumps – and no flushing…

The boss rips in through the door and heads straight for the bathroom. Hammers on the door for a minute or two till our hero finally steps out with a smile and with a sweeping bow, sends him into the tiny room. Slams the door and locks it from the outside.

Said his goodbyes to all of us and left through the front door. Taking the crapper key with him. By the time we got a locksmith in to unlock and open the door – El Bosso was found lying on the floor in a puddle of his own vomit. Dazed, semi-conscious, completely unaware of our laughter.

New Zealanders by the hundreds stand as a symbolic human chain guarding mosque

Hundreds of people gathered outside a mosque in Wellington, New Zealand, and locked arms to form a human chain, in a symbolic act of protection of the Muslim community during Friday prayer.

The move came as New Zealanders mourn the 50 victims of mass shootings at two Christchurch mosques on March 15, in a national day of reflection to mark a week since the terror attack.

Christchurch newspaper The Press had the word ‘salam’ (peace) in Arabic script in its front page, along with the names of the victims of the attack…

“The atmosphere was sad, quiet, but determined. Many women wore headscarves,” Sue Teodoro, who was at the vigil, told CNN. “Many people cried openly. It was incredibly moving. People were determined that the community should pray without fear today.”

A loving example of a nation without fear, absent the reactionary power of a gun lobby owning the majority power of their government. Unarmed, standing up to defend a part of their community under attack by fools and fascist bigots.

International Women’s Day saw U.S. Women’s Soccer Team file landmark lawsuit

Alex Morgan

❝ While some sporting brands used International Women’s Day to launch their Women’s World Cup team kits, lawyers representing the world-champion U.S. team were on their way to a California courthouse to file a landmark lawsuit that would rock the sport.

Instructed by the 28 members of the women’s national team, they filed a suit accusing the U.S. Soccer Federation of gender discrimination, alleging that it pays them less than their male counterparts…

“They sacrifice their whole lives to play for their country, they’re together and play more games than the men’s team and they’ve been more successful,” Ireland striker Stephanie Roche told Reuters.

“They are more like a club team in some ways, they play that many games. I think they have proven that they are equal, they have brought success and therefore have every right to demand equality,” she added…

Winners of four Olympic gold medals and three of the seven World Cups that have been held to date, the U.S. women’s team are ranked first in the world and have never been lower than second, while the American men are currently 25th.

Keep on rocking in the Free World!