Wooden Ships

My favorite version. David Crosby, Graham Nash, Grace Slick. Doing nothing but making beautiful music together.

Yes, I remember moments like this in my life back in the day. Never wanted to work hard enough at it to find the big time. Singing with folks who wanted to hear the music, the words, feel the sound and emotion…was always enough. Even after I stopped.

We’re going to miss you, David.

Well, I wake up in the morning…

Most all the years I spent as a performing artist, Leadbelly was my idol. I had a lovely Epiphone Bard 12-string guitar and a good enough voice to match my ear for being on pitch. Sold my axe when I stopped performing, left New England for the Navajo Nation, eventually Santa Fe. Music has been centered in my life since childhood. Thanks, mom.

Still have a 6-string stashed in the study. Yamaha. Take it down and think about being some kind of old-timer…once in a while.

Yes, Blondie rocks…

Been a musician too long to be concerned about when a song is written (1st version 1974), first hit recording of it (1978) or oddments (one of the first recordings with computer-generated percussion).

The song is still rocking sweet…mostly because of Debbie Harry. Solid pitch.

God Save the Queen

“God Save the Queen” is a song by the English punk rock band Sex Pistols. It was released as the band’s second single and was featured on their only studio album, Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols. The song was released during Queen Elizabeth II’s Silver Jubilee in 1977. The record’s lyrics, as well as the cover, were controversial at the time, and both the BBC and the Independent Broadcasting Authority refused to play the song.

The song reached number one on the NME charts in the United Kingdom, but only made it to #2 on the official UK Singles Chart as used by the BBC. This led to accusations by some that the charts had been “fixed” to prevent the song from reaching number one. In March 2001, the BBC wrote that the single “reached number one in the UK in 1977 despite being banned by the BBC”

The record cover, depicting a defaced picture of Queen Elizabeth II, was designed by Jamie Reid and in 2001 was named number 1 in a list of 100 greatest record covers of all time by Q Magazine.