Brit Hume — Check Your Screenshots Before Tweeting


Click to enlarge

Someone remind Fox News’ Brit Hume to close down the tabs on his internet browser the next time he decides to share a screenshot online.

On Tuesday morning, the conservative network’s senior political analyst posted a screen grab of primary election betting odds showing former Vice President Joe Biden as the Democratic 2020 front-runner, ahead of Sen. Bernie Sanders…

Twitter users were more titillated, however, by an open browser tab reading “Sexy Vixen Vinyl.”

Har!

Something out there Is Sending Signals

A mysterious radio source located in a galaxy 500 million light years from Earth is pulsing on a 16-day cycle, like clockwork, according to a new study. This marks the first time that scientists have ever detected periodicity in these signals, which are known as fast radio bursts (FRBs), and is a major step toward unmasking their sources.

FRBs are one of the most tantalizing puzzles that the universe has thrown at scientists in recent years. First spotted in 2007, these powerful radio bursts are produced by energetic sources, though nobody is sure what those might be. FRBs are also mystifying because they can be either one-offs or “repeaters,” meaning some bursts appear only once in a certain part of the sky, while others emit multiple flashes to Earth…

“We conclude that this is the first detected periodicity of any kind in an FRB source,” the [Canadian] team said in a paper published on the preprint server arXiv in late January. “The discovery of a 16.35-day periodicity in a repeating FRB source is an important clue to the nature of this object.”…

But while we know where it is, we still don’t know what it is.

Reflect on how little our species has advanced. If the signal is artificially produced, I don’t believe we can reproduce it and return the call. That’s OK. The answer to that is “not yet”. Bring in a True Believer and they can pray to it. Bring in a traditional American politician and they will begin to plan how to kill it.

Forecast: Clear and seasonably cold, possible falling iguanas

The concern for people in South Florida is that these iguanas often sleep in trees, so when their bodies go dormant, they appear to fall from the sky onto streets, cars, pools, or even people walking around. And since iguanas are large — adult males can reach 5 feet in length, and weigh up to 20 pounds — this can be dangerous if one lands on top of you.

The invasive species can’t handle cold temperatures very well because they are cold-blooded. In general, iguanas begin to get sluggish or lethargic once the temperature drops below 50 degrees Fahrenheit…

Not everyone is concerned about the well-being of these iguanas, though. They are considered an invasive species, so some people are looking forward to an opportunity to rid their yards of these reptiles.

What can I say? Long, long time ago, I had a pet iguana. Named “Hank”.

Lithium-Sulfur Battery Could Quadruple Battery Life

Researchers at Australia’s Monash University have developed what they’re calling “the world’s most efficient lithium-sulphur (Li-S) battery,” an ultra-high-capacity design that could quadruple camera battery life and run a smartphone for 5 consecutive days without a charge.

The Monash team, led by Dr. Mahdokht Shaibani, has reason to be optimistic. Their design already has an approved patent, prototypes have already been manufactured in Germany, and “some of the world’s largest producers of lithium batteries” have apparently expressed interest in upscaling production.

…The new Li-S design seems to offer the best of all worlds: boasting four-times the performance of the best Li-Ion batteries on the market while significantly decreasing the environmental impact of manufacturing. And while the main examples given in the announcement are phones (5 day battery life) and electric cars (1000km/621-mile range), the potential applications in all consumer electronics…are obvious.

I’m waiting, I’m waiting!

Thanks, Honeyman

Glacial melting happening much faster than predicted, out of sight, underwater…


NOAA

Underwater melting of tidewater glaciers is occurring much faster than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at Rutgers and the University of Oregon.

The findings, which could lead to improved forecasting of climate-driven sea level rise, are based on a new method developed by the researchers that for the first time directly measures the submarine melting of tidewater glaciers.

The study appears in the July 26 issue of the journal Science.

❝ “We found that melt rates are significantly higher than expected across the whole underwater face of the glacier — in some places 100 times higher than theory would predict,” [study co-author Rebecca] Jackson said.

Out of sight, out of your mind – if you don’t include it all in your analysis.