Antibiotics stewardship reduces rate of hospital readmission for children

Among 176 children treated for nonchronic complex care issues and without underlying medical conditions, none were readmitted within 30 days if the physician accepted the recommendation of the pharmacist-physician antibiotics stewardship team, reported Jason Newland, MD, of Children’s Mercy Hospital-Kansas City in Missouri, and colleagues.

In comparison, among the 88 children whose doctors rejected the recommendations, 3.4% required readmission, they said at the annual IDWeek conference.

Newland noted that the difference was statistically significant

The pattern was similar among children who had chronic complex care issues. Of the 149 children whose doctors accepted the recommendations regarding use of antibiotics, there was no 30-day readmission. However, among the children whose doctors said No to the recommendations, the readmission rate was 2.6%, Newland said.

“We are only talking about two or three new admissions,” he acknowledged, “but there was none” in the groups where the recommendations were explained and were accepted by the doctors.

Pranita Tamma, MD, who moderated the IDWeek press briefing where the study results were presented, told MedPage Today that “antimicrobial stewardship programs generally consist of a physician and a pharmacist who oversee, guide, and educate clinicians in their institutions about the appropriate use of antibiotics. The goal of every stewardship program in the U.S. is to ensure that every patient who requires an antibiotic receives the right drug, the right dose, by the right route, and for the right duration of time.”

Dr. Pranita Tamma noted for the press briefing – “Ultimately, we believe that this improves the care of children while decreasing the unintended consequences of antibiotic overuse, including allergic reactions, severe diarrheal illnesses, hearing loss, kidney and liver damage, and, of course, antibiotic resistance.”

Hear, hear.

Expert report condemns continued antibiotic use in US livestock

U.S. regulators and livestock producers have failed to curb the use of antibiotics in cattle, pigs and poultry despite concerns that excessive use in meat production will reduce the drugs’ effectiveness in humans, a panel of experts said.

“Meaningful change is unlikely in the future,” concluded the 14-member panel, assembled by Johns Hopkins University, in a report released on Tuesday that quickly drew protests from livestock industry groups.

The release marked the fifth anniversary of a landmark 2008 Pew Charitable Trust report that called for an end to the sub-therapeutic use of antibiotics by livestock producers, as well as an end to practices such as tiny cages for laying hens…

The Johns Hopkins’ report said “additional scientific evidence has strengthened the case that these (non-therapeutic) uses pose unnecessary and unreasonable public health risks” of allowing bacteria to develop resistance to antibiotics.

“We have even better science to support the recommendations we have made,” said Mary Wilson, an epidemiologist at Harvard University. “We are, in fact, running out of antibiotics. We are seeing infections that are untreatable.”

More than 2 million Americans are sickened by antibiotic-resistant infections each year and 23,000 of them die, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control And Prevention.

Livestock industry leaders said “Blah, blah, blah”

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