It ain’t a blood moon, blue moon or supermoon. Still fun to see…

On Wednesday, humanity will be treated to a celestial trifecta: A supermoon (meaning it’s relatively close to Earth), but also simultaneously a blood moon (it’ll be orange or red), but also simultaneously a blue moon (the second full moon in one calendar month) will pass in the shadow of Earth, for a total lunar eclipse. It’s going to be righteous.

But supermoon? Blue moon? Blood moon? Yeah, let’s go ahead and pump the brakes on those terms, because the first was created by an astrologer, the second is highly subjective, and the third was only recently popularized by this-must-be-prophecy types…

It’s going to be great, I can assure you. It’s an eclipse, for heaven’s sake, regardless of the semantics. And it almost certainly won’t be the end of the world.

I’ll second that emotion. And leave out the nice guy “almost certainly” for folks who like to spook themselves.

Worcestershire copper investigated “suspicious” moonlight

A police constable has risked embarrassment after launching an investigation into a “suspicious light source” which was later found to be the moon.

The constable was on duty late one evening last month when he spotted a “shining light” glowing over Clent Hills, a range of scenic peaks which rise up more than 1,000ft in Worcestershire.

He radioed his sergeant, telling him he was “off up the hills” to investigate the “suspicious bright light” from ‘over the other side of the hills’.

He warned that as he was “single-crewed” he might require back-up if he found a crime in progress.

The area is known as a hotspot for outdoor sex – and it is believed the officer thought he might catch offenders engaged in sexual activity when he mistook the bright light of the moon for car headlights.

After a 20-minute walk up the hills, however, the red-faced officer radioed his sergeant back, telling him that the ‘light source’ was in actual fact the moon.

The incident is believed to have taken place on August 31, the night of the second full moon of the month – a phenomenon known as a blue moon…

A police source said today: “The officer was a little reluctant to come back on duty the next day.

“He knew he was going to get a ribbing and he’s had pictures of werewolves put on his locker by some of the more unforgiving officers.

Har. He could always emigrate and have a job waiting for him in Murfa, Texas.

Blue moon to light the sky this New Year’s Eve

If you have anything ridiculously ambitious or wondrously farfetched you’d like to achieve in life, then we’d strongly suggest aiming to achieve such goals this coming New Year’s Eve – a date on the calendar expected to be marked by a distinct ‘blue moon’.

Beyond the obvious ‘once in a lifetime’ adage, stargazing astronomers have revealed that 2010 will be ushered in alongside a genuine blue moon, which, while not nearly as rare as you may think (usually about once every 30 months), will be the first to illuminate the night sky on New Year’s Eve since 1990.

According to astronomer David Reneke of Australasian Science magazine, the next New Year’s Eve blue moon isn’t likely to happen until 2028.

To historians enjoying astronomy, the last century cast a “blue moon” into existence whenever there were two full moons in a single month.

For me, as I have through the happiest years of my life – I celebrate my wife’s birthday every New Year’s Eve.