Mint fires boss over coin typo


Daylife/AP Photo used by permission

Chile’s mint has sacked its managing director after he sent into circulation thousands of coins bearing an incorrect spelling of the country’s name.

The 50-peso coins, worth around 10 U.S. cents each, were issued in 2008 with Chile spelled “Chiie” — an error that was only noticed late last year.

Director Gregorio Iniguez has been fired over a series of issues, including the misspelled coins, which have brought the institution into disrepute,” a mint official told Reuters on Friday, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Yes, if you can find any hang onto them. Screwups like this always appreciate better than the real deal.

Pay toilets on an airplane. Har!

paytoilet

It has long cost more than a penny to use a public lavatory but Ryanair is threatening to bring a whole new meaning to sky-high prices by charging passengers to use its aircraft’s toilets.

Michael O’Leary, the budget airline’s chief executive, revealed today that it is considering coin slots on cubicle doors.

“One thing we have looked at in the past and are looking at again is the possibility of maybe putting a coin slot on the toilet door so that people might actually have to spend a pound to spend a penny in future,” he told BBC Breakfast.

He insisted this would not inconvenience passengers. “We are always looking at ways of constantly lowering the cost of air travel and making it affordable and easier for all passengers to fly with us. I don’t think there is anybody in history that has got on board a Ryanair craft with less than a pound. What do you do at Liverpool Street station at the moment [when] you need to spend a penny? I think you have to spend 20p to go to the toilets.”

So, what do you do when you don’t have a coin for a pay toilet?

Ancient Celtic coin cache found in Netherlands

A hobbyist with a metal detector struck both gold and silver when he uncovered an important cache of ancient Celtic coins in a cornfield in the southern Dutch city of Maastricht.

Archaeologists say the trove of 39 gold and 70 silver coins was minted in the middle of the first century B.C. as the future Roman ruler Julius Caesar led a campaign against Celtic tribes in the area.

Curfs said he was walking with his detector this spring and was about to go home when he suddenly got a strong signal on his earphones and uncovered the first coin.

“It was golden and had a little horse on it — I had no idea what I had found,” he said.

After posting a photo of the coin on a Web forum, he was told it was a rare find. The following day he went back and found another coin. “It looked totally different — silver, and saucer-shaped,” he said. Curfs notified the city of his find, and he and several other hobbyists helped in locating the rest of the coins, in cooperation with archaeologists.

Nico Roymans, the archaeologist who led the academic investigation of the find, believes the gold coins in the cache were minted by a tribe called the Eburones that Caesar claimed to have wiped out in 53 B.C. after they conspired with other groups in an attack that killed 6,000 Roman soldiers.

I love this dude. His metal detector habit is a meditative hobby and not an obsession.

That’s why I bring a camera along on my walks. Helps me focus on the intricacy of nature’s beauty.