Oath Keeper planned coordinated action with Proud Boys before riot


Reuters

A reputed leader in the Oath Keepers militia group discussed forming an “alliance” and coordinating plans with another extremist group, the Proud Boys, ahead of the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, according to new court papers.

The court filing — detailing messages from Kelly Meggs, described by authorities as the leader of the Florida chapter of the Oath Keepers — is the first time prosecutors have suggested that the members of the two far-right extremist groups were communicating with each other before coming to Washington.

Meggs is among 10 members and associates of the Oath Keepers charged with plotting to stop the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory. The case against those affiliated with the Oath Keepers is the largest conspiracy case brought by prosecutors so far in the attack.

Several members of the Proud Boys, who describe themselves as a politically incorrect men’s club for “Western chauvinists,” have also been charged with conspiring to obstruct Congress.

On Dec. 19, Meggs wrote in a Facebook message that he “organized an alliance” between the Oath Keepers, Proud Boys and Florida Three Percenters, an anti-government movement.

We have decided to work together and shut this s—t down,” Meggs wrote…

No surprises…other than these ego-smitten, middle class reactionaries didn’t have the smarts to keep from bragging before, during and after the fact about their plan to disrupt the constitutionally-required counting of ballots.

Which conspiracy theory do you think is the truth?

Everyone believes at least one conspiracy theory,” says Asbjørn Dyrendal, a professor in NTNU’s Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies who specializes in conspiracy theories.

The more conspiracy theories you bring up, the more people answer yes to one of them.

That fact leads American conspiracy researcher Joseph Uscinski at the University of Miami to posit that all people believe in at least one conspiracy theory. Dyrendal basically agrees, but he modifies Uscinski’s statement slightly, saying all people believe some conspiracy theory “a little.”

As they do in many belief systems, degrees of belief can add up and sooner or later a generalized accumulation of quantitative beliefs topples over into a qualitative change. You’re now convinced.

It’s a conspiracy.

QAnon has folks running for Congress on their nutball myths

In November 2017, Marjorie Taylor Greene, a small business owner in the suburbs of Atlanta, uploaded a nearly half-hour long video to Facebook outlining the elements of a new conspiracy theory known as QAnon, which casts President Donald Trump in an imagined battle against a sinister cabal of Democrats and celebrities who abuse children.

“Q is a patriot, we know that for sure,” Greene said in the video, which has since been deleted. “There’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to take this global cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles out, and I think we have the President to do it,” she said, referring to Trump…

There is no factual evidence or foundation for the conspiracy theory. In the three years since the conspiracy was born, QAnon has grown from an American virtual cult to a global phenomenon. QAnon beliefs aren’t just divorced from reality but can instigate real-world violence; The FBI warned last year that QAnon posed a potential domestic terrorist threat.

And now the people who have engaged with the QAnon conspiracy theory, including Greene, are running for Congress.

Because their campaign is baked into absurdist conspiracy theories doesn’t make this klown show any less dangerous than the Neo-Nazis playing at being conservative Republicans. Read it and weep. And wake up your friendly neighborhood Democrats to the need to stand up to these creeps.

New charges could put Manafort away for 25 years


Carlo Allegri/Reuters

❝ On Wednesday morning in a D.C. courtroom, former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort engaged in what we assume was, for him, a deeply humiliating act: he expressed remorse, presumably for the first time in his 69 years on earth. Or, at least, he tried to. “I am sorry for what I’ve done and all the activities that have gotten us here today,” he told Judge Amy Berman Jackson, claiming that he shouldn’t get more jail time for the copious federal crimes he committed because he is his adult wife’s “primary caretaker,” and the two of them need each other…

While that reasoning might have worked on Judge T.S. Ellis, who strangely argued last week that Manafort had led a “blameless life” outside of all the crime, Jackson wasn’t having it, sentencing him to an additional 43 months on federal conspiracy charges, and letting him know she saw right through his act: “Saying I’m sorry I got caught is not an inspiring plea for leniency…”

❝ And, somehow, it’s unlikely that that was the worst part of Manafort’s day! Because literal minutes later, this happened:

New York prosecutors Wednesday announced criminal charges against President Donald Trump’s former campaign chief, Paul Manafort, only minutes after his sentencing in a federal case. The indictment, unveiled by Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance, charges Manafort with 16 counts related to mortgage fraud, conspiracy, and falsifying business records. . . . Crucially, Trump does not have pardon power for state charges.

❝ …Last week, a grand jury moved to charge the guy who ran the president’s campaign with residential mortgage fraud, conspiracy, falsifying business records, and a handful of other crimes. If he’s convicted of the most serious charges, he could spend up to a quarter of a century in prison

Nice start to another piece of potential justice for one of Trump’s assistant creeps. If we’re lucky, we’ll live long enough to see Manafort and, eventually, the creep-in-chief spend some well-deserved time in the slammer.

Parents of Kids Murdered at Sandy Hook School Sue Conspiracy Nutball

❝ Parents of two children killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School attacks filed defamation lawsuits on Monday against right-wing conspiracy theorist and radio show host Alex Jones, who has questioned the authenticity of the 2012 shooting that left 26 dead, including 20 children.

Leonard Pozner and his former wife, Veronique De La Rosa, parents of Noah Pozner, and Neil Heslin, the father of Jesse Lewis, are seeking more than $1 million in damages in separate lawsuits…

❝ “This conspiracy theory, which has been pushed by InfoWars and Mr. Jones since the day of the shooting, alleges that the Sandy Hook massacre did not happen, or that it was staged by the government and concealed using actors, and that the parents of the victims are participants in a horrifying cover-up,” the plaintiffs said in their suits.

Both boys were among 20 first-grade students killed inside the school in Newtown, Conn.

The level of conspiracy fabrication beloved of nutballs like this deserves the contempt heaped upon Jones – for example – as a scumbag and a liar.

Will Ted Cruz take a DNA test to prove he’s not reptilian?

❝ Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) was asked an unexpected question Tuesday by a woman. The video of his reply has gone viral.

❝ The video uploader, who identified herself as Tammy Talpas, first explained that she was really worried about missing out on healthcare benefits because she had seven pre-existing conditions.

“If you force me into a high-risk pool, you will either bankrupt me or kill me,” she said. “I take these threats of medical aggression personally and seriously, and I can assure you I’m not the only Texan who does. My question is: Will you pledge to submit to a DNA test to prove that you’re human?

Har!