Quality infrastructure maintenance


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No injuries were reported when a Union Pacific train derailed and caught fire on a bridge over Tempe Town Lake in Arizona, officials said Wednesday.

Plumes of smoke could be seen rising into the morning sky beneath a trail of flames on video and images from the site of the derailment, where part of the bridge collapsed.
The train was hauling unknown hazardous material, according to the Tempe Fire Department.

One section of the Salt River Union Pacific Bridge — which was built in 1912 — had completely collapsed just on the side of the lake, with some of the train cars detached and on the ground.

Quality infrastructure maintenance — How NOT to do it!

Feds supply Yankee Stadium rain ponchos for hospital workers’ PPE

Desperate times call for desperate measures. But this is just plain wrong.

A doctor at a hospital in New York City tweeted a photo Tuesday of the coronavirus PPE (personal protective equipment) she was issued.

I’m a physician at a hospital in NYC and THIS IS THE “PPE” I WAS JUST HANDED for my shift. Our federal government has completely failed its health care workers. #GetUsPPE

That’s how bad the coronavirus pandemic has become. Medical supplies are in such short supply and high demand that the doctors and nurses working on the front lines in hospitals are being asked to protect themselves from a deadly virus with something that doesn’t even keep people dry at Yankee Stadium.

And Trump probably took a commission for the shipment from the Yankees’ PR budget.

Crap survey says Corona beer sales crashing from coronavirus fears

Some American beer drinkers are allegedly avoiding Corona beer amid the deadly coronavirus outbreak–at least according to a controversial new survey.

38 percent of beer drinkers surveyed reportedly insisted they would not, under any circumstances, buy Corona as the highly-publicized virus spreads across the globe, according to the survey conducted by 5W Public Relations, via the New York Post…

Of course, despite some people frantically searching a connection between the easy-drinking Mexican beer and the feared virus on Google, there is no connection between Corona beer and coronavirus — except for the name.

But this connection is manufactured, and [the survey] is ignoring far more mundane reasons Americans might not buy a Corona, including that they don’t like the taste. Of those Americans who did report regularly drinking Corona, only 4 percent said they would now stop drinking the beer.

So while everyone should be washing their hands frequently and taking all the precautions suggested by the CDC to avoid contracting Coronavirus, it looks like we can all continue to drink as much Corona beer as we want.

I am surprised the reported number is only 4%. This is a nation that handed the presidency over to numbnuts. Perhaps there is hope for us, after all.

When ignorant peasants vote to kill their children…

Over and over again, fools who think flags and fake presidents will bring them the riches and power reserved only for those who actually own America…get what history reserves for those who believe in patriotism over peace, slogans instead of the steady march of science and technology, peasant ideology over knowledge, collaborating with political thugs who twist and bend life into death.

Most expensive fighter ever — F-35 Ejection Seats will only harm a couple dozen pilots 1st year in service

❝ The F-35 fighter jets’ flawed ejection seats, which Air Force officials said in May had been fixed, still pose a “serious” risk that will probably injure or kill nearly two dozen pilots, according to an internal Air Force safety report that service officials withheld from the press.

The F-35 Joint Program Office — which runs the $406.5 billion initiative, the most expensive weapons program in history — has declined to try to save those lives by conducting less than a year’s worth of additional testing that would cost a relatively paltry few million dollars, the report shows…

❝ Specifically, the 2015 tests indicated 98 percent “probability of fatal injury” for pilots weighing less than 135 pounds when ejecting from the original seat when the jet was too low to the ground to cushion the force of the ejection by the smaller parachute, according to the internal documents.

For pilots weighing up to 165 pounds, there was a nearly one in four chance of fatal injury, the documents showed. In Air Force press releases, that was described merely as “elevated” risk

❝ New F-35s will have the somewhat improved seats, but all but four of the 235 jets that pilots are flying today have yet to be modified…

But, the military-industrial complex is making a boatload of money. Which do you think counts more with the Pentagon or Congress. Profits or pilots?

Voter impersonation fraud – 31 credible incidents out of one billion ballots cast

❝ Voter ID laws are back in the news once again, with two new opinions from the Wisconsin Supreme Court late last week dealing with the state’s ID requirement, which would allow people to vote only if they provide certain forms of government-issued ID. The Court made some minor changes to the law but otherwise upheld it. However, the ID requirement is still on hold pending a federal lawsuit.

Part of this litigation — and any rational debate about the issue generally — hinges on two things: costs and benefits. The costs of these sorts of laws vary, because the laws themselves differ from state to state (some are far more burdensome than others). The ostensible benefits, though, are all the same. And in addressing these purported benefits, the Wisconsin Supreme Court blew it. Twice.

❝ First, the court cited the idea that ID laws could enhance public confidence–that is, in theory, the laws might make us feel better about elections in that they might provide some security theater. It turns out, though, that this effect is hard to spot…

Second, the court said that ID laws can help stop fraud. It then cited an example of recent fraud … that ID laws aren’t designed to stop…

❝ Instead, requirements to show ID at the polls are designed for pretty much one thing: people showing up at the polls pretending to be somebody else in order to each cast one incremental fake ballot. This is a slow, clunky way to steal an election. Which is why it rarely happens.

❝ I’ve been tracking allegations of fraud for years now, including the fraud ID laws are designed to stop. In 2008, when the Supreme Court weighed in on voter ID, I looked at every single allegation put before the Court. And since then, I’ve been following reports wherever they crop up.

To be clear, I’m not just talking about prosecutions. I track any specific, credible allegation that someone may have pretended to be someone else at the polls, in any way that an ID law could fix.

So far, I’ve found about 31 different incidents (some of which involve multiple ballots) since 2000, anywhere in the country. If you want to check my work, you can read a comprehensive list of the incidents below.

To put this in perspective, the 31 incidents below come in the context of general, primary, special, and municipal elections from 2000 through 2014. In general and primary elections alone, more than 1 billion ballots were cast in that period.

So much for the happy horseshit shoveled atop public understanding of electoral fraud. The Republican Party in general – and lately, Donald Trump, el Supremo – have been parroting this crap at the expense of state budgets and constitutional rights.

Time to lose this latest Big Lie before it becomes any more acceptable by gullibilus voter americanus.

Preservatives won’t harm you — just look at this 40-year-old Twinkie!

In a glass box in a private school in Maine sits a 40-year-old chemistry experiment still going strong: A decades-old Twinkie.

The experiment started in 1976 when Roger Bennatti was teaching a lesson to his high school chemistry class on food additives and shelf life.

After a student wondered about the shelf life of the snack, Bennatti sent the students to the store with some money. When they returned with the treat, Bennatti ate one and placed the still-surviving Twinkie on the blackboard.

Bennatti has since retired, but the snack now resides in the office of George Stevens Academy’s Dean of Students Libby Rosemeier.

Rosemeier told ABC News she isn’t sure who will inherit the Twinkie when she retires, but joked that the Smithsonian hasn’t called yet.

Eeoouugh.