Floriduh man gets 41 days in slammer for heroin detergent trafficking

❝ For nearly six full weeks, 29-year-old Matt Crull said he sat inside a Florida jail for a crime he didn’t commit.

The charge was trafficking heroin, according to CBS12. It came with a steep potential punishment and bond, which frightened Crull, who said an officer mistook laundry detergent for heroin…

❝ Crull was arrested by Martin County Sheriff’s deputy Steven O’Leary on Dec. 5, according to WPTV. Sheriff William Snyder says the officer has been fired after an investigation uncovered that at least 11 people he put in jail for drug charges were found innocent, the TV station reported.

❝ “He showed me a picture of the field test kit that he supposedly conducted, on his phone,” Crull told CBS12. “He never actually showed me the real test kit.”…

“I just looked at him baffled and confused,” he told WPTV, “because I had no idea as to where 92 grams of heroin came from inside my van.”

I think I understand now why some folks call that state “Floriduh”…

Actually not too funny to me. I had the same thing happen landing in Glasgow in 1971. Start of a walking trip across Europe. Everything to fit in the backpack; so, usual tricks to save weight.

Always used Woolite powder for washing any clothing when living rough – threw away the box and carried it in a plastic bag. Immigration copper was certain it was smack. I told him what it was; but, he had to try a tiny snort for a field test. Dude had bubbles coming out of his nose for 5 minutes while his mates laughed.

Prick stamped my passport to be out of the country within the month. Just because he embarrassed himself.

Brilliant laundry detergent ad urges men to do more housework

This ad from India for laundry detergent movingly shows how women deal with the “second shift” — working all day and coming home to even more household chores. And it shows how we could break the (laundry pun intended) cycle:

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Click through to the video and the article

The ad is going viral after Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg shared it on her profile, calling it “one of the most powerful videos I have ever seen.”

In the two-minute ad, a father visits his grown daughter and her family and watches her — after a day at work — juggle work calls and dinner preparations and her son’s stained shirt.

Meanwhile, her husband watches TV. “I am so proud. And I am so sorry,” her father says in voiceover. “Sorry that you have to do all this alone. Sorry that I never stopped you while you were playing house. I never told you it’s not your job alone, but your husband’s too. But how could I say it when I never helped your mom either?”

We later learn that the voiceover is a letter, and her father closes by promising to do better, starting with doing his own laundry from his trip to visit his daughter…

Own up, dudes!

Look here, kiddies. More poison that looks like candy

Childhood poisonings from a new type of detergent packet have soared in recent weeks, experts say, with the total climbing to more than 1,200 this week from about 200 in late May.

Health authorities have been concerned since late March, when poison control centers around the country noted a small number of reports from parents whose children had opened and swallowed the brightly colored laundry detergent products, which are small enough to fit in a child’s palm and may be mistaken for candy. The detergent packets were introduced by a various companies over the winter as a convenience that can be easily dropped into a washing machine.

But because of their bite-size shape and candylike colors, many toddlers and small children have been eating them. Poison control centers first starting putting out alerts about two to three months ago, not long after the products were introduced in the United States. By late May, the number of reported cases had reached 200 to 250 nationwide, prompting widespread news media attention and an announcement from Tide, which makes one of the most popular forms of the products, that the company would change its packaging to make the packets more difficult for children to tamper with.

Doctors involved with poison control centers say they don’t yet know why the packets are more dangerous, why children getting the contents into their systems are suffering such severe reactions. That’s all well and good. You can have plenty of time to study them after you get them out of the stores.

Some of the responses are hilarious. Parents need to do more than just put these products out of the reach of children. Don’t “just put these up high, but to put them up very high in a locked cabinet…” Cripes – they’re being sold as a convenience product to people too lazy to measure out detergent in a little cap.

Get this dangerous crap out of the stores!