GOP “Commitment to America” doesn’t include learning how to navigate the Web


They simply flipped documentary footage from Russia

House Republican leaders on Friday unveiled their “Commitment to America” agenda for 2023 ― and with it, an inspirational video full of scenes presented as exceptional imagery of America that were actually stock footage from Russia and Ukraine.

The GOP’s video, “The Preamble to the Commitment to America,” opens with a narrator highlighting aspects of what it means to be an American.

“We celebrate the rich heritage of the American story and the vibrancy of the American Dream,” the voice says, over footage of a drilling rig at sunrise.

But this video snippet, an apparent nod to America’s natural resources, wasn’t filmed in America. It’s stock footage created by Serg Grbanoff, a filmmaker based in Russia.

This bumped Jennifer Bendery’s curiosity enough to start her looking around, checking on productions on other websites “designed” to build the online presence of leading Republicans. Turds like Mitch McConnell and Kevin McCarthy.

Consistent mistakes. Guess they just discovered the Web

Thanks, Ray K.

GOP Pol says Hitler can inspire the homeless


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As the Tennessee Senate debated a bill that would classify camping on public property as a misdemeanor, Republican state Sen. Frank Niceley argued that homeless people had a chance to not just find shelter but also enjoy history-making lives.

But as he attempted to make his point on Wednesday about how homeless people could change their fortunes, Niceley picked someone who went from homeless to historical for all the wrong reasons: Adolf Hitler, the Nazi leader who led the genocide that killed millions of Jews.

“I haven’t given you all a history lesson in awhile, and I wanted to give you a little history on homelessness,” Niceley said. “[In] 1910, Hitler decided to live on the streets for a while. So for two years, Hitler lived on the streets and practiced his oratory, and his body language, and how to connect with citizens and then went on to lead a life that got him in the history books.”

Later on, he tap dances around his choice in lifestyle examples. I don’t know if that makes him a halfway hypocrite or just a smug politician trying to get his sheep’s clothing on for the press. And I don’t care. He went on to vote to arrest homeless folks who dare to setup encampments.

Tennessee Republicans propose ending age requirement for marriage

Tennessee Republicans are moving forward with a bill that would eliminate age requirements for marriage in the state.

The bill, HB 233, is scheduled to be heard in the House Civil Justice Committee on Wednesday and would establish common-law marriage between “one man” and “one woman,” but it does not include a minimum age requirement. Opponents of the bill said it could open up the possibility of child marriages. The current age for marriage in the state is 17 with parental consent, according to WKRN…

There is no federal legislation in the United States regarding the minimum age for marriage, and states are allowed to set their own parameters. Currently, child marriage is legal in 44 states and nearly 300,000 children were married between 2000 and 2018 across the country, according to United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).

FRONTLINE data shows girls are more likely to get married than boys while still minors. Between 2000 and 2015, almost 90 percent of children who got married were girls and most were 16 or 17 years old. Children as young as 12 have been granted marriage licenses in South Carolina, Alaska and Louisiana, while 13-year-olds have been married in 14 states.

In the U.S., 44 states legally allow child marriages while the Philippines banned the practice in December. Only six states have banned child marriage, including Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, Rhode Island and New York.

It might be useful, one of these centuries, to involve scientific study to set a range of parameters to serve as national guidelines for marriage. As it is, we’re stuck with state variations, regulations influenced by religions ranging from staid to nutball. Frankly, I see no concerted gathering of knowledgeable research having the slightest chance of altering these circumstances…in the United States.

GOP’s DeSantis anti-health stunts turn to casting doubt on kids’ vaccines 

As the US faced down a global viral threat two years ago, its people and leaders couldn’t seem more factious and impotent against a shared foe…Two years later, the US has tallied nearly 80 million cases. Nearly 960,000 people—grandparents, parents, siblings, children, infants, precious loved ones all—are dead. Nine hundred and sixty thousand. It’s an unfathomable loss—a toll one might at least hope would stir reconsideration in those not fighting for the greater good. Yet, here we are two years and nearly 1 million deaths later, and many have not changed their positions. Some Americans still deny the devastating realities of the pandemic. Some spread dangerous misinformation, twist facts, and squabble over trivial points as lives hang in the balance.

And some leaders are guilty of far worse. Instead of rising to the occasion, bridging divides, and trying to save the lives of their people, they’ve sought personal and political gain by capitalizing on divisiveness and endangering their constituents.

One of the most prominent examples of this is Florida Governor Ron DeSantis. Throughout the pandemic, the Republican has pulled stunt after stunt to score political points, pandering to a base that eschews the moral and social responsibility to help protect the health and safety of those around them. DeSantis has fought or hindered masking, vaccine uptake, and physical distancing. He enabled the spread of the dangerous falsehood that a life-saving vaccine against COVID-19 “changes your RNA.” He withheld funding to schools who chose to require masks. He publicly scolded and bullied high school students for wearing them, calling it “theater.”…

As the body count mounts, DeSantis has only grown bolder. On Monday, he trotted out his latest anti-health antic: a roundtable discussion with fringe members of the health and science communities. DeSantis’ guests included Robert Malone, an anti-vaccine advocate who falsely claims he invented mRNA vaccines; Tracy Høeg, who uses her sports medicine credentials to downplay the pandemic; and health economist Jay Bhattacharya, who is a proponent of letting the pandemic coronavirus spread…the false idea that COVID-19 is not a grave threat to public health and thus the virus should be allowed to spread in order for the population to achieve herd immunity.

After more than an hour of fringe talking points, [Floria’s surgeon general, Joseph] Ladapo concluded with the announcement that “the Florida department of health is going to be the first state to officially recommend against the COVID-19 vaccines for healthy children.”…The recommendation, of course, contradicts the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which recommends everyone ages 5 and up get a COVID-19 vaccine.

There are few creatures I hold with more contempt than opportunist politicians. That species willing to endanger the lives of their electorate and families…in crude lies trying to reinforce “value”, somehow, to voters.

Arizona GOP goes for nutball primary


Contenders!
Dario Lopez-Mills/AP Photo

Just when it seemed Arizona Republicans couldn’t make more of a spectacle, they found another way.

As the party hardens around its fealty to former President Donald Trump, the GOP is filling up its midterm ballot with a roster of conspiracy theorists and extremists that could threaten the party’s prospects in a state that’s drifted leftward in recent elections.

The latest of those candidates is Ron Watkins, a celebrity in the QAnon conspiracy world suspected of being Q, who announced his plans to run for Congress last week.

It isn’t just that Watkins embraces the baseless claim that the November election was stolen. It’s that an entire ticket is running on that falsehood now. The state’s congressional delegation features Rep. Paul Gosar, who spoke earlier this year at a conference organized by a white nationalist, and Rep. Andy Biggs, who falsely maintains “we don’t know” who won the presidential election in Arizona.

Helluva sideshow! Primary season for Republicans around the United States is looking more and more like reruns from bad television plots on Fox.