Florida city employee rang up $93K on city credit cards to get butt lift – among other frauds

❝ An investigative report…shows a former city of Gainesville employee, accused of stealing more than $93,000 from the city, spent some of it on a Brazilian butt lift.

The report found that former city staff specialist Natwaina Clark, 33, charged her city-issued credit card 136 times for roughly $61,000 in unauthorized charges, used her bosses’ cards at least 36 more times for an additional $31,000, and spent nearly $900 on a coworker’s card five times between November 2015 and March 2017.

The report also finds department heads acted negligently, allowing city funds to be misspent.

❝ Documents attached to the report show Clark, who was hired in August 2015, funneled roughly $41,000 to her personal PayPal account, linked to her bank account, and that $8,500 of it went toward a Brazilian butt lift. The cosmetic surgery procedure uses fat from one part of the body to augment one’s buttocks…

Clark, whose salary was $33,500, was fired from the city March 21, while on a cruise-ship vacation, the report said. She was arrested March 28 and charged with larceny and scheme to defraud, both felonies…

❝ The city report found the city’s human resources department failed to properly execute the city’s employee background screening and didn’t advise the hiring department about concerns in Clark’s history, allowing her to be hired.

Har. Turns out the HR Department didn’t really do their homework about Clark being busted for similar crimes in another county. Didn’t tell folks in the department where she was hired of any concerns.

Applying for a job? – You may have to take a meaningless test

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is probably the most widely used personality test in the world…An estimated 2 million people take it annually, at the behest of corporate HR departments, colleges, and even government agencies. The company that makes and markets the test makes somewhere around $20 million each year.

The only problem? The test is completely meaningless.

“There’s just no evidence behind it,” says Adam Grant, an organizational psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania who’s written about the shortcomings of the Myers-Briggs previously. “The characteristics measured by the test have almost no predictive power on how happy you’ll be in a situation, how you’ll perform at your job, or how happy you’ll be in your marriage.”

The test claims that, based on 93 questions, it can group all the people of the world into 16 different discrete “types” — and in doing so, serve as “a powerful framework for building better relationships, driving positive change, harnessing innovation, and achieving excellence.” Most of the faithful think of it primarily as a tool for telling you your proper career choice.

But the test was developed in the 1940s based off the untested theories of an outdated analytical psychologist named Carl Jung, and is now thoroughly disregarded by the psychology community. Even Jung warned that his personality “types” were just rough tendencies he’d observed, rather than strict classifications. Several analyses have shown the test is totally ineffective at predicting people’s success in various jobs, and that about half of the people who take it twice get different results each time.

Yet you’ve probably heard people telling you that they’re an ENFJ (extraverted intuitive feeling judging), an INTP (introverted intuitive thinking perceiving), or another one of the 16 types drawn from his work, and you may have even been given this test in a professional setting.

RTFA. It goes through the stereotypes, explains why these labels are meaningless — and why no one in the 21st century should rely on the test for anything.

I had fun with the test before I moved to the Southwest. Interested in a job with a dynamic high tech startup, I applied to see what they might offer – and ran into this test. The HR dude was in love with its self-fulfilling prophecies. After all, if you tell people how to define their lives and lifestyle long enough and thoroughly enough – and they follow your so-called wisdom – then, results become appropriate. Even if they’re nothing more than imitation.

I drove him nuts answering segments of the test with two completely contradictory personality styles. He was dying to hire me; but, was equally afraid I might turn out to be an axe murderer.

UK investment firm has an “oops!” email moment – tells their worldwide staff how to handle their departure

Workers at investment firm Aviva Investors got a shock on Friday when the company accidentally sent an email with leaving instructions intended for one departing employee to the entire worldwide staff of 1,300 people.

The firm’s human resources department realized its mistake and recalled the offending message 25 minutes later and soon afterwards sent out another email apologizing to staff for the error, company spokesman Paul Lockstone said…

“People were pretty quickly aware of the fact that this was a mistake … I don’t believe any of our staff would have seen it really as anything other than the mistake that it was.” As he stepped aside from the bodies hurtling from the roof.

The email was a standard message sent to people leaving the company, covering things such as handing back company equipment and confidentiality rules, and did not tell recipients they were fired, Lockstone said…

Lockstone said he did not know why the intended recipient of the email was leaving the company.

Probably running for safety.

ASPCA doesn’t think racist symbolism is a threat – WTF?

A black ASPCA employee who found a noose in the organization’s Queens garage claims officials blew off her complaint and told her the hanging rope was for “operational purposes.”

Sanoy Fleming, a part-time clerk in the records department, made the shocking discovery on Sept. 11 and used her phone to snap a photo.

Fleming, who has hired a lawyer, said a black colleague told her the noose had been hanging for several days in the garage of the spay and neuter clinic, which opened last June in Glendale.

“I was very upset, and it made me uncomfortable that no one thought it was inappropriate,” Fleming, 40, told the Daily News.

“I explained to my supervisor that nooses were used to hang slaves, and I explained how insulting that is to African-Americans.”

Fleming’s supervisor apparently reported the incident to ASPCA higher-ups – four days later she was put on a conference call with the human resources department.

A man who identified himself as “George” warned Fleming that her work was not up to par.

“At the end of the conversation, he said, ‘I heard you were upset about a rope found in the garage,’ and he said that it was used for ‘operational purposes’ to lift things,” the Brooklyn woman recalled.

New York City, eh? So, if someone working at City Hall wore a swastika to a meeting chaired by Mike Bloomberg it would go unnoticed? Hogwash!

Symbols of racist lynchings are brought to the workplace for only one reason. To intimidate Black workers. The culprit may be a white dodo-bird. More likely the culprit is a bigot who enjoys the racism game to prop up his tiny, limp self-image.

Office affairs are private – except for having to tell the boss!

The proposal is contained in a draft policy on relationships at work produced by human resources officials at Fenland District Council, which covers a rural area in central England north of Cambridge.

“Any employee who embarks on a close personal relationship with a colleague working in the same team must declare the relationship to his/her manager in writing,” the document said, adding the details would go on the employees’ personal files.

Furthermore, the policy warns that “intimate behaviour during work time is not acceptable.”

Lust in the stationery closet ain’t permitted.

“This applies during all working time (not flexed off time), both on and off Council sites,” the document added. “Any breach of this could be regarded as a disciplinary offence … leading to disciplinary action.”

The Trades Union Congress, Britain’s union umbrella body, condemned the proposal, saying workers should not have to disclose details about their private lives outside office time, which their bosses probably did not want to know about either.

“It’s quite common for relationships to start in the office, but having to declare your feelings via the HR department is hardly the most romantic way to make a move,” said Sarah Veale, TUC Head of Employment Rights.

Now, here’s management with entirely too much free time on their hands.

Why you didn’t get the job!

cartoon-job-interview

“I’m not wanted in this state.”

“How many young women work here?”

“I didn’t steal it; I just borrowed it.”

“You touch somebody and they call it sexual harassment!”

Believe it or not, the above statements weren’t overhead in bars or random conversations — they were said in job interviews…

We asked hiring managers to share the craziest things they’ve heard from applicants in an interview. Some are laugh-out-loud hysterical, others are jaw dropping — the majority are both. To be sure, they will relieve anyone who has ever said something unfortunate at a job interview — and simply amuse the rest of you.

“I have a problem with authority.” – Carrie Rocha, COO of HousingLink

“If I get an offer, how long do I have before I have to take the drug test?” – Bolzan

“When you do background checks on candidates, do things like public drunkenness arrests come up?” – Bolzan

“I was fired from my last job because they were forcing me to attend anger management classes.” – Smith

“You should probably know I mud wrestle on the weekends.” – Venne

Wander through the list. You may find yourself in there.

Human Resources check out your website? 1 in 3 aren’t hired


Think he’ll be hired as account manager

Written references could become old hat for hiring managers with one in five saying they use social networking sites to research job candidates — and a third of them dismissing the candidate after what they discover…

An additional nine percent said they don’t currently use social networking sites like Facebook or MySpace to screen potential employees but they do plan to start

The top area for concern among the hiring managers with 41 percent citing this as a downfall were candidates posting information about drinking or using drugs.

The second area with 40 percent of concern were candidates posting provocative or inappropriate photographs or information.

Other areas of concern to arise from social network sites were poor communication skills, lying about qualifications, candidates using discriminatory remarks related to race, gender or religion, and an unprofessional screen name.

Try to switch on your brain before you post that photo, folks.