7th Grade student steers school bus to safety after driver collapses


 
A young 7th grade student steered a school bus to safety after the driver apparently had a heart attack while driving.

Jeremy Wuitschick, 13, took control of the wheel and steered the bus to the side of the road in Milton, Washington, before starting CPR on the driver.

Another student, Johnny Wood, trained in first aid, also helped him, while others phoned emergency services.

Police said all 12 students on the bus were unhurt, but the driver was in a “grave condition” in hospital…

Footage from a surveillance camera on the bus showed the driver fainting, and Jeremy running up to steer the bus and remove the keys from the ignition…”I was just thinking ‘I don’t want to die’,” he told KING-TV.

Other students on the bus called the emergency services, while Jeremy and Johnny started chest compressions on the driver…

Police praised the students for their quick thinking and stopping the bus safely.

Students are trained in emergency procedures, including what to do if a bus driver is incapacitated, Deputy Schools Superintendent Jeff Short told The News Tribune. “It’s just for this type of situation,” he said. “I think they did an outstanding job.

Bravo.

Thanks to Jeremy and Johnny. They remembered their training. Thanks to the school for providing it.

First newborn given xenon gas to prevent brain injury


Riley Joyce with his mom and dad, Sarah and Dave

A newborn baby has become the first in the world to receive xenon gas treatment, pioneered in Bristol in a bid to prevent brain injury.

Riley Joyce had no pulse and was not breathing when he was first delivered by emergency Caesarean section at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He had a 50:50 chance of permanent brain injury and was transferred to St Michael’s Hospital, Bristol.

His parents agreed to the experimental treatment and Riley is now doing well.

Every year in the UK more than 1,000 otherwise healthy babies born at full term die or suffer brain injury caused by a lack of oxygen or blood supply at birth…

Professor Marianne Thoreson said: “After seven days, Riley was alert, able to look at his mother’s face, hold up his head and begin to take milk.”

She said: “Over the past eight years, we have shown in the laboratory that xenon doubles the protective effect of cooling on the brain.
“However we faced the challenge of how to safely and effectively deliver this rare and extremely expensive gas to newborn babies.”

Dr John Dingley, who invented a machine to deliver the gas, said: “A key design feature of this machine is that it is very efficient, using less than 200ml of xenon per hour – less than the volume of a soft drinks can. “Xenon is a precious and finite resource and difficult to extract so it can cost up to £30 a litre…

The device is now authorised for clinical trials and will be used on a minimum of 12 babies over the coming months in a feasibility trial before it can be used on a larger scale.

Bravo!