Congressman back after 32-years – says corruption overwhelming

RickNolanElectionDay2012_640
NRA + the rest of the Old Right opposed him. He won by 9 points.

First elected to the House in 1974, Rep. Rick Nolan, D-Minn., left after his third term ended in 1981–and now after a 32-year hiatus, Nolan is back. Much to his surprise, the biggest change he’s encountered was the work week, and he’s not happy about it…

“My first term, we worked 48 out of 52 weeks,” Nolan said on Friday’s edition of The Daily Rundown. “Most of those days were four and five day weeks. We were in committee virtually every morning, we were on the floor of the House throughout the afternoons and the evenings and we were working in the process of governing which is what we’re elected to do.”

He expressed his disappointment that Congress is only currently scheduled to work 34 out of 52 weeks and considers most of those days “not real.”

“We went into session Monday, for example, we don’t have any votes scheduled until 6:30 in the evening, we were also scheduled to work on Tuesday–which we did–and then we were scheduled to work on Wednesday and we took the day off,” Nolan said.

Nolan quickly agreed with the public’s sentiment “everybody’s campaigning and nobody’s governing,” saying Congress isn’t governing like they should especially with all the serious issues the country is facing. He told Todd that the time given for Congressional members to campaign and the money they use has become “toxic.”

“I mean, we’re told here two things,” he said. “One is the one with the most money gets the most votes and number two – you should be spending 30 hours a week in fundraising and call time–dialing for dollars.”

Though I would prefer it, we do not need a change to an elected parliamentary form of government to get rid of the overwhelming influence of money – and whose money it is – in our government. Simply limiting campaign time to the 60 days before an election, severely limiting the amount of money that can be spent during that time – and only that time – takes care of half the problem.

Add in the sort of regulations that governed lobbying 50 years ago and you remove the other half of the corruption equation. The problem facing both of these provisions is that it limits the profits from a congressional career. Not that it matters in the least to the actual governing of this nation.

What matters is having a Congress that isn’t for sale to the highest bidder.

Dumb enough to answer the advert for a job as gigolo in Spain?

A gang of six based in Fuengirola on Spain’s Costa del Sol made at least €50,000 euros after persuading some 180 men to pay a joining fee to register as gigolos. The elaborate scam lured men in with advertisements in the national media promising vast returns for wining and dining lonely women.

Men wanting to follow in the footsteps of ‘Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo’ – a 1999 comedy about a fishtank cleaner who goes into business as a male prostitute – were then asked to pay joining fees of between €200 and €1,000 euros to be put on the books of “reputable agencies”. But the online agencies were hoaxes and the clients never materialised.

Police said the masterminds behind the scam were a husband and wife and her older brother. Three others were arrested for opening bank accounts used to transfer money from the victims for five per cent of the profits…

Police said they uncovered the network after receiving complaints from different men who said they had never received any work as a result of signing up with the agencies.

Falls under the category of “too good to be true” usually means too good to be true, eh?