This Black man was on the phone in a hotel lobby — so, staff called the police!

❝ A guest at a Portland hotel is alleging he was harassed by staff when he was asked to leave the property after taking a phone call in the hotel lobby late Saturday night.

Washington state resident Jermaine Massey was in the lobby of the Portland DoubleTree when a security guard informed him that police were on their way to escort him off the property.

❝ In a series of Instagram videos of the incident recorded by Massey and obtained by CNN, he is heard asking the guard, “But why? But I’m staying here.” “Not anymore,” the security guard replies…

❝ DoubleTree General Manager Paul Peralta issued a statement about the incident Wednesday, calling it, “unfortunate”…Massey accused the guard of “harassing” him, and in a statement provided to CNN by his attorneys, characterized the incident as “calling his mother while black.”

Every now and then I say to myself, “Self! I don’t believe there is any new and original way Americans might illustrate the racism so deeply rooted in this society? And, then, I am proven wrong.”

Arboreal Halloween Costume

Ursa was leaving the library, today, in Portland – when she saw and snapped this evergreen tree wearing leaves that have fallen from a nearby deciduous tree. The recent windstorm & rainstorm helped shape the decorations.


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Thanks, UrsaRodinia

Truck full of hagfish rolls over releasing thousands of slimy sea creatures


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❝ In a scene straight out of nightmares, a truck full of “slime eels” lost its load Thursday on U.S. 101, causing a five-car crash, dousing sedans with goo and sending sea creatures slithering across vehicles and the highway.

❝ Technically, the fish were not eels, but hagfish, which have a skull but no jaw or spine and they secrete slime when distressed, earning them the nickname “slime eels.”

And distressed they were, emitting gooey stuff that will make you shiver in your sandals — and that covered 101 along with the 7,500 pounds of fish.

Eeoouugh! Looks like a strategy meeting in the Trump White House.

Rare 1907 photos advertising the Southern Pacific Railroad show West Coast in color


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❝ Check out these rare photos to follow the “road of a thousand wonders,” along the California coast on the Southern Pacific Railroad.

❝ The…images from 1907 start in Los Angeles, and work their way up to Oregon. There are over a hundred stops along the way, including Ojai, San Luis Obispo, Santa Cruz, Santa Barbara, and many of California’s missions, including San Juan Bautista. The trip also includes Carmel-By-The-Sea, Oakland, Berkeley, and San Francisco, including images of the city’s resurrection from the 1906 earthquake.

❝ The images are from Sunset Magazine, shot for the Passenger Department of the Southern Pacific Company. The pictures of the West were meant to stimulate interest in the Rail Highway along the Pacific, joining California and Oregon, passing the spectacular Shasta, over the Siskiyous, to the Columbia River in Oregon.

Each image, which is in the style of a vintage postcard, is captioned as seen in the publication.

My kind of history. I love period photography. Still have my Italian grandfather’s wooden Eastman camera.

Put this article together with tales from the period, a legitimate contribution to our knowledge of where part of our American civilization comes from.

Nutball Bundys go on trial

❝ This Wednesday, September 7, marks the start of the trial of brothers Ammon and Ryan Bundy and six other defendants charged for their actions during the 41-day occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Harney County, Oregon, earlier this year. The case is the first to bring the Bundy family and their supporters before a courtroom and jury after they were at the center of two volatile standoffs with the federal government.

❝ The Bundy family first gained attention in April 2014 when Cliven Bundy, Ryan and Ammon’s father, forced a showdown with federal officials at his Nevada ranch after the government announced it would seize his cattle for his decades-long refusal to pay public-land grazing fees. The Bundys called on militia members and anti-government extremists to support their crusade, leading to an episode where 400 armed supporters intimidated federal agents tasked with confiscating Cliven’s livestock into abandoning the job and leaving.

❝ His sons renewed their defiance at the start of 2016, occupying the Malheur refuge. The takeover began as a protest of two local ranchers’ prison sentences for arson on Bureau of Land Management land but developed into a weeks-long rally of roughly 25 to 40 people calling for the seizure of federally managed lands across the West to be given to states, counties or private landowners. Even without support from the jailed ranchers and many locals in Harney County, the armed occupiers lingered, controlled access to the refuge, and made use of government offices, computers and vehicles. The occupation wound down only after state police shot and killed one of the leaders, Robert “LaVoy” Finicum, while apprehending the Bundy brothers and others during a January 26 highway blockade.

❝ Cliven Bundy was then arrested in early February at the Portland airport while traveling to support the last of the Malheur occupiers.

❝ “The case against the Bundys is pretty substantial,” says Ryan Lenz, writer for the Southern Poverty Law Center and its Hatewatch blog, which monitors hate groups, militias and anti-government activities. “The real questions at the heart of this trial is what kind of antics will happen and what respect and deference will they give to the court.”

Watch this space. Our uptight media will make scant mention of the trial. No doubt. For-real journalists, especially those cognizant of American history and nutball outlaws like the Bundys will offer thorough coverage. Which we will point out.