The Rio Grande is disappearing

The story of the Rio Grande is similar to that of other desert mountain rivers in the U.S. Southwest, from the Colorado to the Gila. The water was apportioned to farmers and other users at a time when water levels were near historic highs. Now, as a megadrought has descended on the West, the most severe in 1,200 years, the flows are at crisis levels.

And to make things even more uncertain, the drought is accompanied by an aridification of the West — a prolonged drying that scientists say may become a permanent fixture in the region. The number and scope of wildfires are also increasing sharply; New Mexico’s ongoing Calf Canyon/Hermits Peak Fire has now burned 315,000 acres.

The concern of Tricia Snyder and others is that much of the Rio Grande River — already greatly compromised by channelization, dams, and irrigation — is on a trajectory to disappear and take out the bosque forests, fish, and other creatures that live in it and along it. “We’re past the point of easy answers,” she says.

How we got to the edge of disaster – and what is to be done – is central to this article. Please, read on and join in the fight to rescue this historic river.

Medication Overuse Headaches are surprisingly common

There is a critical need to review current treatment strategies for the increasingly common problem of medication overuse headaches (MOH).

“MOH is associated with severe disability, unmet treatment need and little clinical data to support current management strategies” says neurology expert Professor David W Dodick from the Mayo Clinic…

MOH, previously known as rebound headache, drug-induced headache or drug-misuse headache, is a headache that occurs at least 15 days a month when patients overuse medication.

Tolerance to the analgesic effect of the acute medication develops over time, consumption may increase and patients may show withdrawal symptoms when they stop the overused mediation” explains Professor Dodick. “We estimate that the condition affects one in every 100 adults and one in every 200 adolescents worldwide, which is a considerable number.

“For example, in the USA 60 per cent of people with chronic daily headaches attending headache clinics have MOH. Data from a physician study suggests that it may be the third most frequent type of headache after migraines and tension-type headaches.

The international papers that accompany Dr Dodick’s overview show that MOH is a common problem, but the incidence, causes and treatment vary from country to country.

Yet another interesting piece of research on an illness that may seem obscure to some – if you ain’t suffering or dedicated to the prevention and cure of the ailment.

Good luck to Dr. Dodick and his new task as an editor.