QAnon has folks running for Congress on their nutball myths

In November 2017, Marjorie Taylor Greene, a small business owner in the suburbs of Atlanta, uploaded a nearly half-hour long video to Facebook outlining the elements of a new conspiracy theory known as QAnon, which casts President Donald Trump in an imagined battle against a sinister cabal of Democrats and celebrities who abuse children.

“Q is a patriot, we know that for sure,” Greene said in the video, which has since been deleted. “There’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to take this global cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles out, and I think we have the President to do it,” she said, referring to Trump…

There is no factual evidence or foundation for the conspiracy theory. In the three years since the conspiracy was born, QAnon has grown from an American virtual cult to a global phenomenon. QAnon beliefs aren’t just divorced from reality but can instigate real-world violence; The FBI warned last year that QAnon posed a potential domestic terrorist threat.

And now the people who have engaged with the QAnon conspiracy theory, including Greene, are running for Congress.

Because their campaign is baked into absurdist conspiracy theories doesn’t make this klown show any less dangerous than the Neo-Nazis playing at being conservative Republicans. Read it and weep. And wake up your friendly neighborhood Democrats to the need to stand up to these creeps.

Ohio laws don’t cover case of fake boy seducing girls


Patricia Dye and her public defender at arraignment in Juvenile Court

Warren County prosecutors searching Ohio law for felonies to file against Patricia Dye found a charge for rapists who pretend to be someone’s husband to lure their victims.

But the search failed to find any felony fitting the unique facts in the case of the 31-year-old Franklin woman accused of pretending to be a boy named Matt to help build sexual relationships with teenage girls in Springboro and Middletown…

To the chagrin of some observers around the country, Dye faces no prison — and no more than nine months in the county jail if convicted — as a result of the misdemeanor indictments against her.

Tracey Steele, director of Wright State University’s Criminal Justice program, said cases involving women pretending to be boys to lure girls into sexual relationships are “virtually nonexistent.”

“There’s no doubt we’re as unhappy as anyone out there that there isn’t a more high-level crime,” Nolan said.

Matt Nolan said prosecutors also were stifled by the absence of Ohio law making it a crime to pretend to be a different gender to pursue sexual relationships.

Amazing!

RTFA for some of the stuff that won’t surprise you. Shock and cultural whoop-de-doo over the reality of transgender and homosexual relationships. Face it – some of America won’t get out of the 19th Century until somewhere around the 24th Century.

But, I have to chuckle over a state that has at least as many archaic attitudes as any bible belt border state and never even got round to thinking this one up – as a problem.