Who’s policing the cops who joined Trump’s insurrection?


Amanda Andrade-Rhoades

The revelation that the Capitol mob — covered in emblems of extremist groups — included off-duty law enforcement officers possibly assisted by working police is escalating pressure on sheriffs and police chiefs nationwide to root out staff with ties to white supremacist and far-right armed groups.

Law enforcement leaders have faced criticism in the past for failing to police their own officers’ involvement with extremist groups. However, the selfie photos that off-duty officers took inside the Capitol during the violent siege, which left one police officer dead and dozens of others injured, were a wake-up call for many who have long denied the extent of the problem within policing…

We saw the anti-government, anti-equality and racist comments coming out during the Obama administration. Shame on us for representing it as freedom of speech and for not recognizing it was chiseling away at our democracy,” [National Sheriffs’ Association President, David] Mahoney said in an interview. “As we move forward, we need to make sure we are teaching our current staff members that they must have the courage to speak out when they know about another deputy’s or officer’s involvement…

RTFA. Anyone from the Left confronting police attacks often point out which of the coppers were especially racist, violent, in their assault. Confront cops frequently over time, you get to know who you are as likely to see out-of-uniform in the ranks of fascist-minded thugs attacking protestors.

One CNN Reporter Arrested, The Other One Left Alone. Guess What’s Different?


Oscar Jimenez (L) and Josh Campbell (R)

Reporter Josh Campbell described the situation in Minneapolis where a reporter was arrested live on camera…“No, I can tell you my experience has been the opposite of what Omar just experienced there. Talking to police, I identified myself. I told them who I was with. They said okay, you’re permitted to be in this area. As a vehicle came by, they asked me to step out of the street. I asked if I could move back in. They said yeah, you’re good to go. What happened to Omar was clearly a lot different and just something that we certainly haven’t seen, where a journalist identified himself covering a story has been taken into custody by the police,” Campbell said.

“Again, the police knew who our crew was, who they consisted of. They saw the camera and the live shot in progress. Omar identified himself very politely, yet they took that decision to make that arrest.”

I’m not cynical. I’m just not surprised.

A reminder: Unarmed people of color killed by police, 1999-2014


Click to enlarge

After the announcement that NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo would not be indicted for killing Eric Garner, the NAACP’s Legal Defense Fund Twitter posted a series of tweets naming 76 men and women who were killed in police custody since the 1999 death of Amadou Diallo in New York. Starting with the most recent death, what follows are more detailed accounts of many of those included in the Legal Defense Fund’s tweets.

Click here to page through this incomplete record of unarmed people murdered by police.

Black convicts free after 30 years: five questions racist cops must answer

brown and mccollum
Leon Brown and Henry McCollum

Henry McCollum, North Carolina’s longest-serving death row inmate, and his half-brother Leon Brown were released after more than 30 years in prison on Tuesday after DNA tests proved their innocence of rape and murder. The exoneration followed dogged investigations by the two men’s lawyers and by the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission, an independent body that operates with the full statutory powers of the state.

The exoneration and release of the two men now puts the spotlight on the police department in Red Springs, North Carolina, that carried out the initial investigation leading to the 1984 convictions of the then teenagers and their subsequent languishing behind bars.

Here are five questions the police authorities in Red Springs now have to answer:

1. Why did the Red Springs police department consistently deny that it had any evidence in its possession relevant to the murder convictions of McCollum and Brown? Only last month the commission found a box full of physical evidence being held by the police that had been in the department’s possession since the early 1990s.

2. Why did the Red Springs police department consistently fail to disclose to lawyers for the two men or to the local district attorney’s office that detectives had requested a potentially critical fingerprint test just days before the 1984 McCollum-Brown trial? The test would have compared the print found on a beer can at the crime scene with the fingerprints of Roscoe Artis, a convicted sex offender and murderer who lived just feet away from the field in which the body of the victim, Sabrina Buie, was found. Neither the request for the test, nor the fact that it was cancelled a year later before being completed, was ever disclosed.

3. Why was the crime scene investigator, who knew all the details of the crime scene as well as key findings from the autopsy of the victim, involved in the interrogation of McCollum, thus risking that his “confession” would be contaminated?

4. Why did detectives write out confessions for both Brown, then 15, and McCollum, then 19, and ask them to sign the statements? Why did they do so knowing that the confessions were incriminating, that the boys were both intellectually disabled and that they were being interrogated in the absence of any legal representation?

5. Why did the police continue to pursue McCollum and Brown knowing that key elements of their confessions were inconsistent with each other? In their “confessions” the two boys incriminated three other youths as accomplices, and yet when the police investigated those three individuals they found they had watertight alibis and were never prosecuted?

Incompetent racist creeps! And you can extend that subtle description all the way up to the Supreme Court and scumbags like Anthony Scalia.

Take a wander through this companion article at slate.com – the second half of the article focuses in on Scalia’s Old Testament ideology. He actually advocates that if someone [by his low-life standards] receives a fair trial, they should be executed even if innocent!

Thanks, Mike