Fake President wants architecture to move back before democracy, voting rights, an educated populace

A modest example of Trumpler architecture

President Trump is planning on “Making Federal Buildings Beautiful Again” with an executive order that would make a classical style the default for federal buildings in Washington and other parts of the country, The New York Times reported Wednesday.

The draft order would encourage Greek and Roman architectural designs instead of modern architecture. The order is expected to go in front of Trump next month…

“For too long architectural elites and bureaucrats have derided the idea of beauty, blatantly ignored public opinions on style, and have quietly spent taxpayer money constructing ugly, expensive, and inefficient buildings,” Marion Smith, head of the National Civic Art Society, wrote in a text message to the Times.

Smith told The Hill that the order is “a great step forward” in revising the GSA design process and “protecting the classical design of Washington, D.C.,” which has had “bipartisan consensus…for hundreds of years.”

The order would implement a “re-beautification” committee to discuss designs, but the White House would ultimately decide which style is approved. Proposed modern designs would have to reach a higher bar to obtain approval…

The American Institute of Architects has encouraged members to speak out against the order and sign a petition condemning the “top-down approach” of regulating design.

What? You expected a megalomaniac – no conscience, no respect for education, little comprehension of history [especially gross errors] – to take time off from trying to reshape this nation to suit the taste of fascist father-figures.

A “Roman army knife” from 2,000 years ago

A 2000-year-old tool that has gone on display in a Cambridge museum has been taken as proof that the Romans invented the Swiss army knife.

The Roman version of the famous multi-purpose tool includes a spoon, knife, three pronged fork, spike and even what looks like a toothpick.

At only 15cm long it would have fitted easily into the pocket of a discerning diner and is easy to clean and sharpen thanks to the silver and iron used to make it.

The Roman eating implement has been estimated to date from between 201 to 300 AD and originates from the Mediterranean region of Europe.

The tool is currently on display for the first time at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Lucy Theobald, a spokesperson for the museum, said: “It’s believed to be an example of a Roman ‘Swiss army knife’ – a silver implement with a knife, spoon, fork, a spike for extracting meat from snails, and a spatula, which is believed to have been used for poking sauce out of narrow-necked bottles.”

No plastic, either. Every bit is repairable or easily replaceable. If you don’t remember when repairing things used to be part of design.