SELF Magazine makes fun of cancer survivor’s tutu

tutu+runners
That’s Monika on the right

A San Diego runner and cancer survivor says she was snubbed by a popular women’s magazine that used a photo of her wearing a tutu to make fun of the fitness fashion trend.

Monika Allen says she was excited to receive an email from SELF magazine asking for permission to use a photo that showed her running the LA marathon dressed as Wonder Woman and wearing a tutu in an upcoming issue.

But when the April issue came out, Allen said she was “stunned and offended.”

The picture appears in a section of the magazine called “The BS Meter,” with a caption that refers to a “tutu epidemic” and basically makes fun of the women’s outfits, she said…

Allen said the photo was “really offensive for a couple of reasons.” The marathon came right in the middle of chemotherapy, and she says the outfit gave her motivation.

“The reason we were wearing those outfits is because this was my first marathon running with brain cancer,” Allen explained.

Another reason was that she made the tutu herself. Her company Glam Runners makes them and donates the money to Girls on the Run, a charity that sponsors exercise and confidence-building programs for young girls. She said she’s raised about $5,600 for the nonprofit by making about 2,000 tutus over the past three years.

Allen said she emailed SELF magazine Tuesday night. As of Wednesday afternoon, she had not received a response.

In a statement to NBC 7, SELF apologized “for the association of her picture in any way other than to support her efforts to be healthy.”

There are dozens of messages of support for Allen on the Glam Runner Facebook page. Just another example of a presumptuous style of journalism – assuming you know everything about an incident without checking in with easy and involved sources.

Apology noted. For what it’s worth.

Thanks, Ursarodinia

Holiday injuries waiting to happen

According to a poll of Pennsylvania adults, about 17 percent of Pennsylvanians experienced an injury or knows someone who was injured while opening gifts during past seasons.

The Patient Poll…asked participants “Have you or someone you know ever been injured (such as receiving a cut that required medical attention) while opening the packaging (not gift wrap) of a holiday or birthday gift?”

Its findings …

Yes, one time = 6.3%
Yes, more than once = 11.0%
No = 82.7%

The following tips may help:

If you must use a knife or another type of sharp object, cut away from your body.

If you must use scissors, use ones with blunt tips.

Wear protective gloves.

Avoid opening tough-to-open packages in a crowded area.

Don’t use your legs to keep the product stable.

Some pretty scary stuff, eh? I keep a pair of truly heavy-duty shear-type scissors on my desk – just for opening office supplies.

Desert Rhubarb – A self-irrigating plant

Researchers…have managed to make out the “self-irrigating” mechanism of the desert rhubarb, which enables it to harvest 16 times the amount of water than otherwise expected for a plant in this region based on the quantities of rain in the desert. This is the first example of a self-irrigating plant worldwide.

The desert rhubarb grows in the mountains of Israel’s Negev desert, where average precipitation is particularly low. Unlike most of the other desert plant species, which have small leaves so as to minimize moisture loss, this plant is unique in that its leaves are particularly large; each plant’s rosette of one to four leaves reaches a total diameter of up to one meter. Prof. Simcha Lev-Yadun, Prof. Gidi Ne’eman and Prof. Gadi Katzir came across this unique plant growing in the desert while studying the field area with students…and noticed that its leaves are unusually large and covered with a waxy cuticle. They observed an exceptionally ridged structure on each leaf, forming a leaf structure that resembles the habitat’s mountainous topography.

The scientists explained that these deep and wide depressions in the leaves create a “channeling” mountain-like system by which the rain water is channeled toward the ground surrounding the plant’s deep root. Other desert plants simply suffice with the rain water that penetrates the ground in its immediate surroundings.

The findings have shown that the natural selection process has resulted in the evolution of this plant’s extremely large leaves, which improved its ability to survive in the arid climate of the desert. The results of experiments and analysis of the plant’s growth – in an area with an average annual rainfall of 75 mm – showed that the desert rhubarb is able to harvest quantities of water that are closer to that of Mediterranean plants, reaching up to 426 mm per year. This is 16 times the amount of water harvested by the small-leafed plants of the Negev desert region. When the research team watered the plant artificially, they observed how the water flows along the course of the leave’s depressed veins to the ground surrounding the plant’s single root and then penetrates the ground to a depth of 10 cm or more. Under the experimental conditions, water penetrated the ground only as deep as 1 cm.

“We know of no other plant in the deserts of the world that functions in this manner,” the researchers concluded.

Our high desert is nothing like this dry. Probably only comparable conditions down in the Sonoran realm. Still, I think I’ll look around for anything like this.

Dumb crooks of the day

Two St. Lucie County women will probably think twice before leaving pictures of themselves behind.

Cristy McGaw and Tammy Sharp are accused of stealing nearly $200 worth of razors, vitamins and other small items from a Port St. Lucie Wal-Mart.

Police said McGaw, 40, and Sharp, 37, used a self-checkout machine, but only paid for about $70 worth of items.

When confronted by a store employee who noticed that their shopping carts appeared to contain items that totaled significantly more than $70, the women ran off, leaving their “purchases” behind.

Among the items left in the carts were two packages of recently developed photographs of the women with their names and phone numbers on the envelopes, according to the incident report.

Har!