Mama llama trauma

Trooper Levi Macy responded to a call in Eastern Oregon about a wayward llama on a highway onramp…”So, there I was minding my own business when I got a call from OSP Dispatch, telling me that there was a llama, yes a llama, in the road on the I-84 onramp at milepost 304 eastbound. I got there and sure enough a displeased mama llama was laying on the onramp. The owner was taking three llamas from Washington to Utah in the bed of a 1500 Dodge short bed pickup. The truck had a homemade stock rack that didn’t quiet hold the three 🦙 🦙 🦙 (while it took) an uphill corner. Fortunately enough for the llama and myself, the speeds were slow, and traffic was minimal.

“The owner got about a mile down the road before he realized his mama llama was missing out of the back of the truck. But of course, when he stopped his truck, the other two llamas bailed out, running free on the interstate. The owner ran back and gave me the rope to hook to mama llama’s harness. Mama llama refused to get up as you could see by her displeased facial expression … so I told (the owner) that I would llama sit, while he wrangled up the others …”

And so it goes on [what some thought was going to be] a slow day in Eastern Oregon.

Remember knocking on a door and not wondering if you need a bulletproof vest

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An off-duty New Jersey state trooper fired shots at a car with three young men inside as they were trying to drive away from his house after knocking on his door by mistake at night while looking for the house of a friend who lives next door…

The trooper told investigators he suspected the three men were trying to enter his Sparta home, 50 miles northwest of New York City, between 1:30 a.m. and 2 a.m. Sunday, according to the attorney general’s office.

Jesse Barkhorn, 18, who was in the car that night, told The Associated Press on Wednesday that they attended a party earlier and were dropping off one of them at a friend’s house. He said they mistakenly knocked on the door at the house next to their friend’s house. He said they heard a man screaming from inside and they ran back to the car.

They turned around in the cul-de-sac where the home is located and saw the man standing with his weapon pointed at them, Barkhorn said.

“At this point we’re freaking out, ‘It’s a gun. It’s a gun,'” Barkhorn said. “I was like ‘Dude, get out of here.'”

He said the driver accelerated and the man then fired at them. One of the bullets struck the car’s front tire and the driver stopped the car a short distance away.

According to officials, who didn’t release the names of those involved, two 18-year-olds and a 19-year-old went to the wrong house, knocked on the door and fled after a verbal exchange. They got in their car and drove away and the trooper fired three shots with his personal weapon when the car did not stop…

Barkhorn told the AP that after they stopped the car, one of the men fled. He was found by officers hours later.

Barkhorn said all three were taken to the Sparta police department then to state police barracks in Netcong. He said he remained in custody for more than nine hours before being released without being charged.

“It was traumatic. I really have never been in a situation like that,” Barkhorn said. “You don’t really appreciate things until you have a gun pointed at your head. It was really scary.”

Nine hours in state police custody because their cop bubba did the shooting – so it had to be the kids’ fault, right? How long does it take to establish that the cop firing at these kids was the one breaking the law?

Yes, you can be suspicious about someone turning up at your door at 2 in the morning. Maybe even you keep your piece handy if you’re a gun owner. But, if the dudes are obviously hurrying to depart, you needn’t do more than try to get their license number and call it in. You don’t start shooting up the neighborhood.

I’ve been in the same situation – with a young guy showing up at the door who ran out of gas in front of our home. Yes, I had a handgun in my pocket. No need to wave it about or even mention it. And, yes, we hunted up the gas can for our lawnmower and got enough into his car to get him close enough back to civilization to find an all-night gas station and get himself home.

Cripes! Being civilized is really easier than being paranoid.

Phony license plate fools no one

Phony license plate

A Massachusetts state trooper noticed something a little odd about the license plate she spotted on a car on Interstate 391 in Chicopee.

Upon closer inspection, there was a lot odd about it.

The “license plate” on the car pulled over at about 7:30 a.m. Tuesday was actually just a piece of cardboard. In a poor attempt to replicate a real Massachusetts license plate, the letters and numbers were crudely drawn with a red marker.

The word “Massachusetts” and the phrase “The Spirit of America” were written in the appropriate places in blue pen.

The 20-year-old woman driving the vehicle was charged with driving with a suspended license and attaching false plates.

Guilty as charged. Not her. Yet.

But, my best friend converted an old license plate into the new number registered with his car – after the original plate was stolen. Coppers didn’t like his bodywork technique at all.

TSA and coppers in New York and Florida arrested in drug bust

Three Transportation Security Administration officers and two police officers are among 20 people arrested Tuesday on charges of conspiring to distribute tens of thousands of oxycodone painkillers for illegal sale from Florida to Connecticut, according to U.S. Attorney of Connecticut David B. Fein.

According to court documents, TSA and law enforcement officers accepted cash and gift cards to allow large quantities of the prescription drug and large sums of money to be transported between Florida and New York airports.

“In these times no one needs to be reminded about how dangerous it is when officers who have sworn to uphold the law accept money to ‘look the other way’,” Fein said.

Operation Blue Coast” began with an arrest at a hotel in Stamford, Connecticut, on April 8, in which DEA officers recovered 6,000 oxycodone pills from a man who traveled from Florida to Connecticut., officials said.

According to court documents, the man revealed that he traveled back and fourth several times a week over the course of a year, buying drugs in Florida and transporting them to Connecticut through commercial airlines and by automobile. He said he sold the drugs to traffickers in Connecticut for a profit…

According to the DEA, to transport up to 8,000 pills per trip, the man said he paid off the arrested TSA officers who screened the passengers and luggage at the Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach, Florida, and Westchester County Airport in White Plains, New York. He told the DEA he also paid more than $20,000 to TSA officers in New York to make sure he could pass with large sums of cash, the profits from his drug trafficking.

Looks to me that human resources management in the TSA and a couple of police departments are doing about as thorough a job of checking out their employees as, say, the average voter in New York and Florida does at choosing their Congress-critters.

That’s not meant as a joke. Signing off on the Patriot Act and similar repressive laws that limit the liberties of ordinary citizens and then turning the management over to administrators who wouldn’t have noticed they had crooks on the payroll if the DOJ hadn’t sent them a memo – ain’t exactly funny.