Got an itch? 2013 Allergan of the Year – often in moistened wipes

equate feminine wipes
Yes, MI is an ingredient listed in these

“In the last two or three years, we’ve suddenly seen a big increase in people with this type of allergy,” said Dr. Matthew Zirwas, director of the contact dermatitis center at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center. “For some patients, their rash has been unexplained and going on for years.”

Zirwas says the chemical preservative is MI (methylisothiazolinone) and it has been around for years. MI is found in many water-based products like liquid soaps, hair products, sunscreen, cosmetics, laundry products and cleaners as well as pre-moistened personal hygiene products and baby wipes.

“Concentrations of the preservative have increased dramatically in some products in the last few years, as manufacturers stopped using other preservatives like paraben and formaldehyde,” Zirwas said.

The irritated skin can be red, raised, itchy and even blistery, appearing much like a reaction to poison ivy. The three most common areas affected by the allergic reaction include the face, from using soaps and shampoos, the fingers and hands, from handling the wipes, and the buttocks and genitals from using moistened flushable wipes.

“If someone suspects an allergy to moistened wipes, they need to stop using them for at least one month. A week or two isn’t enough time,” Zirwas said.

Zirwas is nationally-known as a kind of ‘dermatologist detective.’ He has spent nearly 10 years sleuthing out the causes of mysterious rashes that others can’t solve. Over the years, he has identified allergies to shoe glue, hot tub chemicals, nickel in food, even a chemical in escalator hand rails. Patients have traveled from as far as Alaska to have him diagnose their skin allergies.

Zirwas says it isn’t clear how many Americans might react to MI, but he says manufacturers are aware of the growing allergy problem and are working on alternatives.

The question easily comes to mind – what level of testing did manufacturers of products like moistened bum-wipes utilize if doctors are discovering allergic reactions are becoming common? Did anyone at the Consumer Product Safety Commission or the FDA happen to ask this question?

Using Banana Boat sunscreen makes you a fire risk – WTF?

The maker of continuous spray Banana Boat sun care products has issued a recall due to a risk that the product could ignite on the skin if it is exposed to a flame or spark before drying…

The company has received four reports of adverse events involving burns associated with the continuous spray products in the U.S., and one in Canada.

“The spray valve opening on the affected products dispenses more than is typical in the industry for continuous sun care sprays. As a result, the product is taking longer to dry on the skin than is typical with other continuous sprays.”

Burn experts said Friday the problem appears to be extremely rare…

Dan Dillard of the Burn Prevention Network pointed out that the ingredients used in aerosol sprays are known to be flammable.

The alcohol and petroleum products listed on the containers are flammable, so the only thing you’re missing in the heat triangle is an ignition source,” Dillard said.

Click the link above to check the specific products.

Questions or complaints? Call the manufacturer at 888-786-8477 workdays or send an email to suncare@customerfollowup.info.