Watch the skies!

In a quiet Thursday report dump, the Pentagon released declassified intelligence on hundreds more of what it now refers to as “unidentified aerial phenomena,” or UAPs for short.

The Director of National Intelligence’s report, which is the second since the Department of Defense opened its All-domain Anomaly Resolution Office (AARO) earlier in Joe Biden’s presidency, lists a whopping 366 total new incidents the Pentagon admits to having knowledge of, though a majority of those did have non-extraterrestrial explanations.

In total, as Vice notes in its write-up of the report, 163 of the UAP sightings on radar seemed to be balloons of some sort, 26 were probably drones, and six others were categorized as miscellaneous clutter, defined by the Pentagon as “birds, weather events, or airborne debris like plastic bags.”

That leaves 171 unexplained events out of the 366 new UAP reports that remain “uncharacterized and unattributed.”…”Some of these uncharacterized UAP appear to have demonstrated unusual flight characteristics or performance capabilities,” the report continues, “and require further analysis.”

And a complete unwillingness to perform that further analysis, attribution, a touch of science.

An Explanation for UFOs Spotted Above Ukraine

In September, Ukrainian astronomers published a report detailing what they thought were unexplained aerial phenomena, or UAPs, flying above the war-torn region. Now, alien-hunting Harvard astronomer Avi Loeb has weighed in on the science out of Kyiv with a paper posted online on Wednesday…

Loeb is the head of the Galileo Project at Harvard University, a program that uses scientific rigor to search for evidence of extraterrestrial life and technology, and former chair of the school’s astronomy department…

Loeb told Motherboard…the authors of the initial paper out of Kyiv had contacted him with their work but that he hadn’t looked at it. The skies above Kyiv, Loeb said, are the last place people should be looking for UAPs right now.

“In science, we’re trying to minimize the noise so that we can pick up the signal and therefore Ukraine would be the last palace on earth where I would search for unidentified aerial phenomena… The noise level is so high,” he said.

Ukraine is at war, and during a war there’s lots of stuff flying through the sky. Drones, aircraft, and artillery shells, and satellites would conflict with any observations made of the sky.

Lots of useful information in MOTHERBOARD’S article. Interesting stuff. Some crap debunked…and how and where more research is needed.

Pentagon’s ‘Anomaly Resolution’ Department Studying UFOs

The Pentagon announced it’s opening an office specifically to chase down reports of unidentified flying objects in a press release on Wednesday. It’ll be called the All-domain Anomaly Resolution Office (AARO) and will work to collect and analyze various reports of UFO activity from across America’s various federal agencies…

The new office is the result of various disclosures of unidentified aerial phenomenon (UAP) by the DoD after lobbying and leaks from groups like Tom Delonge’s To the Stars Academy. Credible witnesses, including Navy pilots, have come forward and described their experiences with UFOs. One recent Navy video leaked by a UFO enthusiast and confirmed by the Pentagon showed a UFO apparently disappearing into the water, which may explain the new office’s focus on “transmedium” objects—objects that flit between space, the air, and under the water.

Same as it ever was. We’ll get a peek at what the boffins have been peering at for years. And still haven’t figured out.

NASA’s UFO talking points

According to newly-released internal documents, NASA is keen on emphasizing its ongoing and impressive work searching for evidence of extraterrestrial life—but less keen on examining evidence brought to it by concerned citizens like the one who wanted NASA scientists to examine “a fascinating UFO UAP Alien cooking pot” the citizen proposed was evidence of alien life or interdimensional travel.

The documents, released under the Freedom of Information Act and posted by the transparency site Government Attic, contain all emails mentioning the term “unidentified aerial phenomena” sent to or from one of NASA’s top flacks between May and November of this year, a period surrounding the release of a highly-publicized government report on unidentified flying objects. They are heavily redacted, citing a deliberative-process privilege that allows the government to shield sensitive material from the public, but in internal communications, NASA administrators or scientists appear to be unaware of any evidence that UAPs have origins in the stars, and mostly concerned with crafting talking points emphasizing NASA’s impressive and ongoing work searching for evidence of life beyond our planet…

The questions and answers in the document, like much of the rest of it, are cloaked behind a veil of secrecy, leaving the question of whether NASA will ever be able to take advantage of public obsession with UFOs as frustratingly unclear as the answer to the question of what exactly UFOs are.

But, as always, worth a look!

Pentagon’s “UFO Report”

Military officials say they have no real idea what’s going on, and need lots of money to find out. And, BTW, they couldn’t figure out what they were looking at 143 times out of 144 reports!

The Pentagon’s long-awaited report on UFOs details 143 sightings of aerial objects that cannot be explained. Titled “Preliminary Assessment: Unidentified Aerial Phenomena,” the report is a product of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (DNI). It’s nine pages long and while its findings are “largely inconclusive,” the report states that a small number of cases where UFOs “appeared to display unusual flight characteristics or signature management” can’t be explained without “scientific advances that allowed us to better understand them.”…

This report didn’t come to many conclusions, but it did pose a few possible ideas. “UAP probably lacks a single explanation,” the report said. “Our analysis of the data supports the construct that if and when individual UAP incidents are resolved they will fall into one of five potential explanatory categories: airborne clutter, natural atmospheric phenomena, USG or industry developmental programs, foreign adversary systems, and a catchall ‘other’ bin.”

Crap report masquerading as a less-than-crap report.

More UFO “information” from the Feds

For months, the public has been awaiting the release of a legally mandated intelligence report laying out what the U.S. government knows about these mysterious craft, which appear to do things outside the reach of known technology. And for days, the public has been disappointed after it was widely reported last week that the unclassified portion of this document will offer neither evidence that UFOs are the product of alien civilizations or credible theories as to what they actually are—though it will, apparently, insist that they are not part of secret U.S. programs…

If the phenomena were Chinese or Russian aircraft, officials said, that would suggest the two powers’ hypersonic research had far outpaced American military development…

One problem with this is that there is, technically, no such thing as a hypersonic weapon. The phrase is a marketing term describing different unproven technologies, including boost-glide vehicles and cruise missiles…

A more salient problem is that hypersonic weapons not only do not but cannot behave in the ways the UFOs that have gripped the imaginations of the public and the Pentagon do. If the idea that these craft are piloted by grey aliens intent on treating humanity as livestock seems magical, it’s more realistic than them actually being revolutionary, physics-defying variants of known weapons systems.

Read through the article. Unsurprising – to me – it looks more like a ploy calculated by our military, Biden, the corporations which will profit from more money thrown down the rathole of creating more unnecessary weapons systems.

What does official Washington have to say about UFOs?

American intelligence officials have found no evidence that aerial phenomena witnessed by Navy pilots in recent years are alien spacecraft, but they still cannot explain the unusual movements that have mystified scientists and the military, according to senior administration officials briefed on the findings of a highly anticipated government report.”

Which means:

1) There’s no evidence that the various UFO sightings over the years are aliens.
2) The US government has no idea what these aircraft, in fact, are…

“US intelligence officials have found no evidence confirming that unidentified flying objects encountered by US Navy pilots in recent years were alien spacecraft but also have not reached a definitive assessment as to what these mysterious objects might be, according to five sources familiar with the findings of an upcoming report on UFOs that is expected to be delivered to Congress later this month.

“According to three of those sources, the report does not however rule out the possibility they are alien spacecraft.”

If there is anyone around who really knows WTF is going on up in the sky…they ain’t telling us!

New rules for UFO sightings start [of course] by calling them something else

The U.S. Navy is drafting new guidelines for pilots and other personnel to report encounters with “unidentified aircraft,” a significant new step in creating a formal process to collect and analyze the unexplained sightings — and destigmatize them.

The previously unreported move is in response to a series of sightings of unknown, highly advanced aircraft intruding on Navy strike groups and other sensitive military formations and facilities…

To be clear, the Navy isn’t endorsing the idea that its sailors have encountered alien spacecraft. But it is acknowledging there have been enough strange aerial sightings by credible and highly trained military personnel that they need to be recorded in the official record and studied — rather than dismissed as some kooky phenomena from the realm of science-fiction…

Luis Elizondo, the former Pentagon official who ran the so-called AATIP [Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program] office, complained after he retired from government service that the Pentagon’s approach to these unidentified aircraft has been far too blasé.

“If you are in a busy airport and see something you are supposed to say something,” Elizondo said. “With our own military members it is kind of the opposite: ‘If you do see something, don’t say something.'”

Tales of American Military bureaucracy still seem to echo the worst of history’s examples. You’d think that with a budget guaranteed larger than any other significant combination of nations a bit of confidence might temper the character of our own Colonel Blimps. Or Admiral Blimps.

It’s raining spiders In Australia…

This month, the weather reports from down under are downright terrible for arachnophobes. That’s because the story that it has literally been raining down baby spiders in one part of Australia appears credible, according to scientists.

Clouds of millions of baby spiders were spotted falling out of the sky upon the so-called southern tablelands of New South Wales earlier this month, coating parts of the countryside and even some homes with the strands of their webs that they rode upon the wind.

“What happens is that during a particular time of the year, particularly in May and August, young spiders in the Outback somewhere throw these threads of spiderwebs up in the air and use them as a parachute to detach themselves from the ground and move in large colonies through the sky,” one local retiree named Keith Basterfield told the Goulburn Post newspaper.

Basterfield also took the opportunity to request the public to send him samples of the spider web material, which is also sometimes called “angel hair.” The paper obliged, publishing his post office box where the public can send their samples.

But there’s a hidden, more bizarre side to angel hair that might be compelling this retiree to ask for spider web donations. Basterfield is well known in the UFO research community, having published a few books over the years on the topic. He’s also been cataloging and analyzing Australian instances of angel hair since at least 2001.

Why? Well, it could be because many UFO enthusiasts and researchers believe that some instances of angel hair could actually be a mysterious substance created by the interaction of a UFO or its electromagnetic field with Earth’s atmosphere.

Balloon spiders

But in this particular instance, both Basterfield and scientists seem to be in agreement that what fell onto Australian fields this month was probably drifting spider webs…

Of course, if we’re talking about alien spiders riding on angel hair created by UFO exhaust, perhaps there is some reason for concern.

In my neck of the prairie they’re called balloon spiders or parachute spiders. For me, they’re a real sign of the transition from spring into summer. The spider silk collects along our fence line.

Now, downstate in Roswell – I’m not so certain what people think.