Comparison charts between vaccinated and not…and who’s in hospital

As the coronavirus continues to surge across the United States, hospitals are again filling up with ill COVID-19 patients. And the vast majority of those patients are unvaccinated, as two new charts help make exceedingly clear.

One of those charts shows that from January 24 to July 24, vaccinated individuals were hospitalized with COVID-19 at a much lower cumulative rate than unvaccinated individuals. And the difference in rates between the two groups has only grown over time. By late July, a total of about 26 adults per 100,000 vaccinated people had been hospitalized for COVID-19. That’s compared with about 431 hospitalized people for every 100,000 unvaccinated individuals — a rate roughly 17 times as high as for those who were vaccinated. The data come from 13 states, including California, Georgia and Utah…

The accumulation of hospitalizations in each group over time, which that first chart shows, illustrates the risk of developing severe COVID-19 overall. And its message is clear: If you’re vaccinated during this pandemic, your risk of hospitalization is much, much lower than if you’re not vaccinated. The weekly rate, on the other hand, is a bit like the speedometer on a car — providing a glimpse of what’s happening week by week as the coronavirus spreads. Its message is also clear: The risk of a vaccinated person becoming hospitalized remains low at any given time, while the risk for unvaccinated people can fluctuate, probably as a result of community transmission.

I don’t mind if you choose to increase your own chance of dying. It’s stupid; but, no surprise. I can’t countenance the number of family and friends or complete strangers you may infect along the way. That’s criminal.

Breakthrough infections?

Just mentioning probably/possible breakthrough infection(s). Fully vaccinated by March ’21…Old geezer; so, get to the head of a couple of lines, anyway. Only symptom recurred 3 times, now…each varied.

Sense of smell disappeared April/May. Came back with a rush June/July, way overpowering with familiar scents. None distorted. Just overpowering. And it didn’t feel like me overreacting to the return.

Now, starting a few days ago, everything smells exactly alike. An aroma like charred potato-skins thrown on a campfire! Damndest thing ever.

Wonder what’s next? Meanwhile, no fever, no usual common cold symptoms, etc. Just this 3rd round of distorted sense of smell. No accompanying nasal symptoms either.

Eideard

p.s. Helen and I’ve discussed the 3rd shot and agree I probably should get it if offered.

Update 12 hours later: Back to sensing lots of smells…though still stronger than “normal”.

Feral cats deployed in war on rats


Click to enlargeRuth Fremson/NY Times

❝ Multitudes of feral cats roam New York City’s concrete jungle, and some now have a practical purpose: They’re helping curb the city’s rat population.

❝ A group of volunteers trained by the NYC Feral Cat Initiative traps wild cat colonies that have become a nuisance or been threatened by construction, then spays or neuters and vaccinates them. The goal is to return them to their home territory, but some end up in areas rife with rats.

Feline rat patrols keep watch over city delis and bodegas, car dealerships and the grounds of a Greenwich Village church. Four cats roam the loading dock at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, where food deliveries and garbage have drawn rodents for years…

❝ About 6,000 volunteers have completed workshops where they’ve learned proper ways to trap cats.

The program is run through the privately funded Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals, a coalition of more than 150 animal rescue groups and shelters. It estimates as many as half a million feral and stray cats roam New York’s five boroughs…

❝ The cat population is controlled through spaying and neutering, provided free of charge by the Humane Society of New York and the ASPCA. In most cases, adoption is out of the question for feral cats because they are just too wild to be domesticated.

Thanks to the volunteers, says Marshall, “we’re protecting wildlife in the city, and the cats get a second chance at life.”

Interesting anecdotes in the article – and a common sense approach to feral urban animals. Spayed, neutered, and most important, vaccinated, they stand a chance for a complete lifespan.