Initial wave created by this eruption almost as tall as the Statue of Liberty

New research reveals more about the magnitude of January eruption, as researchers call for better preparedness

+ The eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano in January created an initial wave 90 metres high – almost the height of the Statue of Liberty (93m)

+ University of Bath tsunami expert calls for better warning systems to detect volcanic eruptions, saying systems are 30 years behind comparable earthquake detection tools…

An international research team says the eruption should serve as a wake-up call for international groups looking to protect people from similar events in future, claiming that detection and monitoring systems for volcano-based tsunamis are ’30 years behind’ comparable tools used to detect earthquake-based events.

Protecting society before and during natural events like this are an assumed responsibility of the scientists and technicians analyzing the whole process. What seems to be required is redoing priorities, eh?

Volcano’s size is impressive. What it may mean for the whole planet is uncertain.

The violent eruption of Tonga’s Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano injected an unprecedented amount of water directly into the stratosphere — and the vapor will stay there for years, likely affecting the Earth’s climate patterns, NASA scientists say.

The massive amount of water vapor is roughly 10% of the normal amount of vapor found in the stratosphere, equaling more than 58,000 Olympic-size swimming pools….”We’ve never seen anything like it,” said atmospheric scientist Luis Millán, who works at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Millán led a study of the water the volcano sent into the sky; the team’s research was published in Geophysical Research Letters…

The Jan. 15 eruption came from a volcano that’s more than 12 miles wide, with a caldera sitting roughly 500 feet below sea level. One day earlier, Tongan officials reported the volcano was in a continuous eruption, sending a 3-mile-wide plume of steam and ash into the sky. Then the big blast came, sending ash, gases and vapor as high as 35 miles — a record in the satellite era — into the atmosphere…

Earlier large volcanic eruptions have affected climate, but they usually cool temperatures, because they send light-scattering aerosols into the stratosphere. Those aerosols act as a sort of massive layer of sunscreen. But since water vapor traps heat, the Tongan eruption could temporarily raise temperatures a bit, the researchers said.

It normally takes around 2-3 years for sulfate aerosols from volcanoes to fall out of the stratosphere. But the water from the Jan. 15 eruption could take 5-10 years to fully dissipate.

Given that timeframe and the extraordinary amount of water involved, Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai “may be the first volcanic eruption observed to impact climate not through surface cooling caused by volcanic sulfate aerosols, but rather through surface warming,” the researchers said in their paper.

This is one to keep an eye on. No doubt we’ll revisit the Hunga Ha’apai volcano more than once in the years to come.

Fagradalsfjail is erupting

The restrained Icelandic volcano Fagradalsfjall on the Reykjanes peninsula stepped into the spotlight on the evening of March 19, 2021, when an eruptive fissure opened in the Geldingadalir valleys.

It had been quiet for over six thousand years, and is the first active volcano in the Reykjanes UNESCO Global Geopark area for 800 years…

Three weeks prior to the volcanic outbreak, an intense earthquake episode began on the Reykjanes peninsula near Fagradalsfjall mountain. It started with an M5,7 earthquake that stirred people in large parts of Iceland…

The earthquakes finally stopped, and everything was quiet for three days. But on a Friday evening, at 20:45 on March 19, 2021, people in Grindavík town and elsewhere on the Reykjanes peninsula reported a glowing light in the sky. No eruption tremor was detected, so the only way to confirm if an eruption had started was to have a look.

The eruption has been described as a “tourist eruption,” a term commonly used by Icelanders for minor eruptions that can easily be accessed. Of course, the usual thing to do when a volcano erupts is to get as far away as possible. But in Iceland, the “usual” response is the opposite. So Icelanders started flocking to the eruption site to look at the spectacular show nature was offering.

As noted any chance I get, Iceland is one of my favorite places on Earth. For obvious geophysical reasons, for the friendliness and openness of Icelandic culture. Get a chance? Go and visit.

Volcano in Iceland returns to life


Vilhelm Gunnarsson/Getty

After a series of earthquakes in Iceland, the long-dormant volcano Fagradalsfjall erupted on Friday night. The volcano is located nearly 40 miles outside of Reykjavik, the nearest city and the country’s capital, and didn’t threaten any lives or infrastructure damage.

Images of the eruption immediately flooded social media as Iceland residents saw lava and ash from the volcano light up the sky.

The country’s Minister of Justice, Áslaug Arna Sigurbjörnsdóttir, took a trip to the volcano as the eruption began to monitor the situation. Sigurbjörnsdóttir posted photos and a live video from the helicopter showing lava oozing down from the eruption.

RTFA. Lots more photos and video. I love Iceland. Haven’t been there in years…and always loved every hour in that beautiful land.

Love the Good Ol’ Days? Middle of the 6th Century Really Sucked!

❝ It’s easy to look back on the past through rose-tinted glasses, as the saying goes, but new research suggests that the mid-sixth century was definitely a time to forget.

A team of historians and scientists has identified A.D. 536 as the beginning of a terrible sequence of events for humankind.

❝ A massive volcanic eruption spewed a huge cloud of ash that shrouded the Northern Hemisphere in darkness and caused a drop in temperatures that led to crop failure and starvation…

Then the misery was compounded in A.D. 542 as cold and hungry populations in the eastern Roman Empire were struck by the bubonic plague.

Scientists have finally figured out where the volcanic eruption happened. Hey, that’s one of the questions answered,

Time-lapse video of volcanic explosion in Mexico

A mesmerizing time-lapse video shows a Mexican volcano’s explosive eruption — spewing ash high into the sky.

The Colima volcano exploded around 9:15 a.m. Wednesday and sent an ash column about 29,000 feet into the air.

More than five minutes of the vulcanian eruption, which ejects lava fragments and lots of volcanic ash, were condensed into 30 seconds for the clip…

Experts say Colima is one of Mexico’s most active volcanoes, with multiple eruptions in recent weeks alone.

Nicely done!

The Bárðarbunga eruption — from inside the Volcano

Iceland’s Bárðarbunga eruption has unleashed a huge quantity of lava — enough to create a landmass the size of Manhattan. What would it be like to watch that terrifying explosion from inside the volcano’s cone? Now you can see for yourself…

Here’s the whole video, as shot via drone by Eric Cheng of camera drone manufacturers, DJI. Cheng explains in a making of video that getting the footage resulted in a melted camera face. The SD card, however, survived, giving this footage possibly the most legit claim to the phrase “face-meltingly awesome” ever.

Wow!

Thanks, Mike

Massive volcano eruption in Indonesia grounds flights in Australia


Click to enlargeSofyan Efendi

A huge volcanic eruption in Indonesia has covered the region in a vast cloud of ash, grounding flights in Australia and south east Asia.

Sangeang Api, a volcano off the Indonesian island of Sumbawa, which lies in one of the most active areas of the Pacific ‘ring of fire’, has erupted at least three times since Friday…

Dramatic images show smoke, ash and debris shooting into the sky, while a flying saucer shaped current of gas wraps around the plumes.

All flights have been cancelled from Darwin airport, Australia’s Northern Territory capital, and disruption is expected for days as the cloud could reach as far south as Brisbane.

The ash cloud from the first eruption is around 20,000 and 50,000 feet high and around 15 km wide, according to reports. It is moving south-easterly over Australia. A second, now over Darwin is sitting at around 45,000 feet, while a third is over Bali.

Wow!