“The Mooch” cites anonymous source on Russia – admits Trump is source


AP

❝ New White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci named President Donald Trump as the anonymous source casting doubt on the intelligence community’s consensus that Russia interfered in the 2016 election during a CNN interview on Sunday.

“You know, somebody said to me yesterday — I won’t tell you who — that if the Russians actually hacked this situation and spilled out those e-mails, you would have never seen it,” Scaramucci told “State of the Union” host Jake Tapper on CNN…

❝ “Well, you’re making a lot of assertions here,” Tapper said. “I don’t know who this anonymous person is that said, if the Russians had actually done it, we wouldn’t have been able to detect it, but it is the unanimous —”

“How about it was — how about it was the president, Jake?” Scaramucci said. “I talked to him yesterday. He called me from Air Force One. And he basically said to me, ‘Hey, you know, this is —maybe they did it. Maybe they didn’t do it’…”

Scaramucci’s use and subsequent revelation of Trump as an anonymous source came as the administration continues to slam media outlets for using anonymous sourcing in stories unfavorable to the White House.

I’m not certain what Forest Gump’s position is on government hypocrisy. All my voting lifetime I’ve had to consider and reconsider which Congressional politicians – if any – were worth trusting. Same for the White House. But, the crew in charge, nowadays, surely establishes a new level of acceptance for sophistry, hypocrisy and downright pathological lying.

Republican healthcare


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Here’s how Republicans want to “repeal and replace” Obamacare…

❝ Republicans have repeatedly identified what they don’t like about the Affordable Care Act: It doesn’t cover enough people, and the deductibles are too high. They then went ahead and drafted legislation that would cover fewer people and drive deductibles even higher.

Thanks, Vox

4 ways the Republicans plan to screw folks on Medicaid

❝ The headlines of the Senate Republican bill’s Medicaid overhaul should be familiar by now: It ends the generous federal funding for Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion and places a federal spending cap on the program for the first time.

The cumulative impact: a $772 billion spending cut over 10 years, versus current law, and 15 million fewer people enrolled in Medicaid in 2026.

❝ But the Senate plan also changes the program in subtler yet still important ways. The consequences might not be on the same scale as ending the expansion and capping spending, but they would still be felt by many of the 70 million Americans who depend on Medicaid.

The changes would be made in the name of reducing costs and encouraging work, but they would also make it harder for people to receive Medicaid benefits.

1) Work requirements

❝ …States would be allowed, under the Senate bill, to require Medicaid enrollees to have a job, look for work, or participate in some kind of job training. There are exceptions: Pregnant women, children, the elderly and disabled, and adults caring for kids younger than 6 years old would be exempted.

2) Retroactive eligibility

❝ …Under the current program, when people sign up for Medicaid, they can get their medical care from the three previous months covered retroactively. That’s an important benefit, as many people don’t sign up for Medicaid until they have a medical incident and start racking up bills.

Under the Senate plan, that coverage would be scaled back to the same calendar month that a person enrolled in Medicaid. The new enrollee would be on the hook for any costs accrued before that.

3) Presumptive eligibility

❝ …The Senate bill would repeal presumptive eligibility, prohibiting hospitals from making those determinations and stopping states from enrolling people in Medicaid expansion on a presumptive basis, as Obamacare had allowed.

4) Eligibility redeterminations

❝ Right now, states are required to recheck a person’s Medicaid eligibility once a year. The Republican plan would require that redetermination every six months.

This has a couple of consequences. First, it could more rapidly end the generous federal funding for Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion; under the Senate plan, states lose that enhanced funding if a person cycles off the program for more than a month. More frequent eligibility checks are likely to lead to more people cycling on and off of Medicaid.

Mostly, Republicans presume you’re a crook. After all, they and their peers are crooked, thieving bastards every chance they get. Why should you be any different, eh?

A 14th Century Puritan lack of faith in human beings that some conservatives believe is still ordained by their god.