Nike’s inspirational commercial – Williams, James, Kaepernik – debuts in NFL season opener

How to bring tears to these old eyes.

It’s been almost 60 years since I walked into a segregated restaurant with two Black friends of mine and a white UAW shop steward. We sat down and ordered lunch – and the owner served us – while a crowd watched our carload of Freedom Fighters challenge just one of the racist customs of the United States of America.

In truth, the crowd that hated our willingness to confront bigotry wasn’t any different from the herd of obedient trolls who jostle for a place in the Backwards Museum of the 21st Century. Slightly more honest than nowadays. They were open about their degenerate white supremacist beliefs.

“Jewtropolis”

New York Times: New York City Is Briefly Labeled ‘Jewtropolis’ on Snapchat and Other Apps

❝ I thought we were beyond this…

The Reformation, the Holocaust, they were supposed to be one time things, we were supposed to now be more civilized. But to quote Talking Heads, it’s the same as it ever was…

***

❝ This is the story of our time, how things went horribly wrong. Blame income inequality, blame globalization, blame the starving of schools, blame the lack of opportunity for those who are not legacies.

But no, it’s easier to blame the Jews.

Same as it ever was.

Thanks, Bob Lefsetz
Thanks, Barry Ritholtz

In the tradition of Connecticut Yankees – with conscience and bravery


Melissa Schlag, Selectman in Haddam, Connecticut

❝ Melissa Schlag won’t stand for President Trump. And since last month, she won’t stand for the Pledge of Allegiance, either.

Around the country, people have used kneeling as a form of silent protest. But in the small town of Haddam, Connecticut, where Schlag is a local official, her refusal to stand during the pledge at town meetings has been met with backlash of its own…

❝ What started as a small gesture quickly garnered a lot of attention…But the criticism isn’t stopping her. As long as Trump’s in office, she says she’ll keep kneeling.

“I don’t see anything changing,” she told CNN. “I don’t see me standing up anytime soon.”

Haddam’s in one of the prettier parts of the state. Dunno if the schools there teach anything about Connecticut history; but, Connecticut Yankees were always ready to fight for justice, honesty – fight against tyranny and bigotry. If I still lived back in New England it would be worth driving to Haddam to support her courage.

Bravo, Melissa Schlag

Percentage of Americans “extremely proud” of that fact becomes a minority

This Fourth of July marks a low point in U.S. patriotism. For the first time in Gallup’s 18-year history asking U.S. adults how proud they are to be Americans, fewer than a majority say they are “extremely proud.” Currently, 47% describe themselves this way, down from 51% in 2017 and well below the peak of 70% in 2003…

While the 47% who are extremely proud to be Americans is a new low, the vast majority of Americans do express some level of pride, including 25% who say they are “very proud” and 16% who are “moderately proud.” That leaves one in 10 who are “only a little” (7%) or “not at all” proud (3%).

The combined 72% who are extremely or very proud to be Americans is also the lowest in Gallup’s trend…

There’s a shallow attempt at analysis in the article – reflecting Gallup’s historic conservatism. They’re willing to accept Republican sophistry on questions provoked by such a survey. In truth, though, Democrats can be guiltless or gutless. As likely to join imperial war or accept “decades are still needed” to overrule bigotry of all kinds – instead of moving forward to new legal forms which inhibit social or economic injustice.

Juneteenth — and where to honor the end of slavery


Click on the photo for details

Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger of the Union Army announced to the assembled crowd at Ashton Villa in Galveston, Texas, “In accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.”

It was June 19, 1865.

Never mind that President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation had been written and read more than two years earlier. Juneteenth, named for the June 19 declaration, started as a celebration of emancipation day in Texas and eventually spread to other states. With celebrations dating back to 1866, Juneteenth now commemorates the end of slavery in the United States.

“America cannot understand its own history unless the African-American experience is embraced as a central factor in shaping who we are and what we have become as Americans,” writes Lonnie G. Bunch, founding director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African-American History and Culture in Washington…

In honor of Juneteenth, the museum helped CNN.com choose six destinations that will enlighten and educate visitors about a complicated period of American history, the road to emancipation.

They are in Georgia, Pennsylvania, Kansas, two in South Carolina and one in California.

For me, it has become Lubbock, Texas.

Most of my life I lived in New England and the choice was easy among friends and family. We’d drive up north of Torrington, Connecticut to the small plot of land saved as memorial as the birthplace of the abolitionist, John Brown. A peaceful country road, a pleasant spot to picnic and remember turmoil and death and change. And Freedom.

I was on the road my first year in the Southwest when Juneteenth came up and I was in Lubbock, Texas. My only clients in town were white and had no idea of the holiday. The Confederate history of Texas didn’t make it likely there would be much official celebrating going on in cotton country. But, at the end of the afternoon I drove to the Black end of Lubbock and looked for a church with lots of cars parked nearby – on a weekday. And found one.

I walked round to a picnic area behind the church and there were a hundred or so folks celebrating the day with music and speeches, music and arms that welcomed a white stranger into the anniversary like I had always lived there. As it should be throughout this land.

Discharged – then Discarded


Enrique Salas — discharged, deported, died

The report features a number of veterans who were in the U.S. legally and sustained physical wounds and emotional trauma in conflicts as far back as the war in Vietnam. Once they returned from service, however, they were subject to draconian immigration laws that reclassified many minor offenses as deportable crimes and were effectively banished from this country…

The treatment of veterans capriciously deported is one of the slimiest acts of an nation that pretends to care about the lives of those who volunteer for national service in the US military.

Ask a neuroscientist “What’s wrong with the brains of Trump voters?”


Trump supporters on CNN

The Dunning-Kruger Effect:

Some believe that many of those who support Donald Trump do so because of ignorance — basically they are under-informed or misinformed about the issues at hand. When Trump tells them that crime is skyrocketing in the United States, or that the economy is the worst it’s ever been, they simply take his word for it.

The seemingly obvious solution would be to try to reach those people through political ads, expert opinions, and logical arguments that educate with facts. Except none of those things seem to be swaying any Trump supporters from his side, despite great efforts to deliver this information to them directly.

The Dunning-Kruger effect explains that the problem isn’t just that they are misinformed; it’s that they are completely unaware that they are misinformed. This creates a double burden.

RTFA…you’ll also discover threat sensitivity, terror management, intense nationalism…all sorts of crap beyond simple-minded ignorance.