“Unique” corona shape?

Read this blog often enough over this summer, you know I love the numbers of Osha in our meadows here in Northern New Mexico. I also get a chuckle when I see articles about the shape of the coronavirus being unique. In nature in general, not so unique. Whether you’re enjoying the scent of Osha on a sunrise walk or – for that matter – fishing from a coastal breakwater and catching a spiny Pufferfish. :-]

On Bullshit

One of the most salient features of our culture is that there is so much bullshit. Everyone knows this. Each of us contributes his share. But we tend to take the situation for granted. Most people are rather confident of their ability to recognize bullshit and to avoid being taken in by it. So the phenomenon has not aroused much deliberate concern, or attracted much sustained inquiry. In consequence, we have no clear understanding of what bullshit is, why there is so much of it, or what functions it serves. And we lack a conscientiously developed appreciation of what it means to us. In other words, we have no theory. I propose to begin the development of a theoretical understanding of bullshit, mainly by providing some tentative and exploratory philosophical analysis.

Scholarly approach to the sociology and psychology of bullshit, it’s significance in American culture. Rather longish essay – and especially useful, I feel, in an election year.

Learn to smile in your mask!

With faces covered to help reduce the spread of COVID-19, some of the facial cues that people rely on to connect with others—such as a smile that shows support—are also obscured.

This will be particularly true for North Americans, says Jeanne Tsai, a professor of psychology at Stanford University and director of the Stanford Culture and Emotion Lab, who value high energy emotions—such as excitement or enthusiasm, which are associated with big, open smiles—more than East Asians do…

…Research has shown that North Americans judge people with bigger smiles to be friendlier and more trustworthy than East Asians, so face coverings may make it harder for them to connect with strangers…

As people navigate a masked world, they’ll need to focus more on the eyes and voice to connect with those around them, a psychologist argues.

Brazilian care home ‘hug tunnel’ so loved ones can embrace


Click to enlarge

A care home for elderly people in southern Brazil has come up with a creative way to bring some love to its residents amid the coronavirus pandemic, by creating a “hug tunnel” that allows relatives to safely embrace them…

The facility is home to 28 senior residents who have been in isolation since March 17, with communication with the outside world limited to video calls.

Luciana Brito told CNN the idea for the “hug tunnel” came from a viral video, where a woman in the United States created a plastic curtain in order to hug her mother.

Love is pretty good at overcoming problems.

A walk just after sunset

Returned, late, from my last walk of the day. Sky looking like an early French Impressionist painting at the edge of the Bois de Boulogne. I felt like an Impressionist walking in the evening mist.

Virga dropping from low clouds. Every color in the sky from grays and pinks to green flashes and blue where the clouds hadn’t reached though half-an-hour past sunset.

The middle portion of my exercise lap along the fence line drops down to the level of the bosque del Rio Santa Fe. On an evening like this one, all you can small is the perfume of the few Russian Olive trees flowering, scattered through the bosque. It could be overwhelming to someone who hasn’t had their senses wrapped in the richness of that wild perfume before. Sometime before this evening.

Such a lovely way to finish with daylight.