Game changer for blood pressure

It’s estimated that close to half (45%) of all US adults suffer from a form of hypertension or high blood pressure. Perhaps even more troubling, only 24% of those individuals have their condition under control…

So, what can you do to lower your high blood pressure/prevent hypertension from ever occurring? For years, doctors have long advised hypertension patients to get moving. Walking has supposedly been the “gold standard” behavioral treatment for blood pressure issues. Now, however, a new study just released by the University of Saskatchewan finds stretching actually provides more blood pressure benefits than walking…

“Everyone thinks that stretching is just about stretching your muscles,” says kinesiology professor Dr. Phil Chilibeck, a co-author of the study, in a release. “But when you stretch your muscles, you’re also stretching all the blood vessels that feed into the muscle, including all the arteries. If you reduce the stiffness in your arteries, there’s less resistance to blood flow.”

Looks to be a really interesting read…a useful addition to my regular exercise routine. My blood pressure is already low for an old geezer. A lifetime of aerobic exercise and sport has pretty much sorted that out. But…and that’s the important part…nothing wrong with modifying, updating the whole regimen when research suggests an addition.

I come and stand at every door…

No unique occasion. On my sunset walk, this afternoon, I was remembering times past, those who are gone. I remembered opening for Dr. King some time back in the 1960’s when I was singing a lot, everywhere. It was a street corner rally in New Haven, Connecticut. We had a wooden platform up on a corner so folks could see and hear. And, as well as I recall, this was one of the last songs I sang before introducing MLK.

Learned it from Pete’s recording.

U.S. coppers 3X more likely to use force on leftwing demonstrators


Marcio José Sánchez/AP
Cop pepper sprays kneeling, non-violent demonstrator

Police in the United States are three times more likely to use force against leftwing protesters than rightwing protesters, according to new data from a non-profit that monitors political violence around the world.

In the past 10 months, US law enforcement agencies have used teargas, pepper spray, rubber bullets, and beatings at a much higher percentage at Black Lives Matter demonstrations than at pro-Trump or other rightwing protests.

Law enforcement officers were also more likely to use force against leftwing demonstrators, whether the protests remained peaceful or not.

The statistics, based on law enforcement responses to more than 13,000 protests across the United States since April 2020, show a clear disparity in how agencies have responded to the historic wave of Black Lives Matter protests against police violence, compared with demonstrations organized by Trump supporters.

Numbers don’t lie. The source is the U.S. Crisis Monitor. RTFA. You can do the same thing THE GUARDIAN did. Sort the data. Do the math.

I don’t need to duplicate what a lifetime of demonstrating against racism, injustice, bigotry and bombs dropped on civilians has taught me.

Remaining true to the people, team and country I love outweigh the benefits of any individual award

“Recently I was offered the opportunity to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, which I was flattered by out of respect for what the honor represents and admiration for prior recipients. Subsequently, the tragic events of last week occurred and the decision has been made not to move forward with the award.

“Above all, I am an American citizen with great reverence for our nation’s values, freedom and democracy. I know I also represent my family and the New England Patriots team. One of the most rewarding things in my professional career took place in 2020 when, through the great leadership within our team, conversations about social justice, equality and human rights moved to the forefront and became actions.

“Continuing those efforts while remaining true to the people, team and country I love outweigh the benefits of any individual award.”

Bill Belichik

In the several years I’ve included this, my personal blog, in my public and private life on the Internet, I must have previously noted that I’m a supporter of the New England Patriots in the NFL. Lots of contributing factors above and beyond the usual sports-on-TV watchers reasons. About as traditional as it gets in most sports around the world.

The Pats were my home team. Not just that I lived in the Boston area and this was a serious New England team in the NFL. I mean they were my HOME team – the last place I lived in New England before moving Out West. When the Pats were playing a home game, I would get on my mountain bike and make it through a couple old paved backroads, some dirt roads, a bike track through the woods…all in under 45 minutes. Lock my bike to any handy evergreen – so, it would be hidden – as well as secure. Walk another couple minutes into Schaefer Stadium parking lot and up to the main gate. Up into the stands to support my home team.

GO PATS!

BRAVO, BELICHIK!

Tech & the American Crisis

by Om Malik

Actions taken by technology platforms in the wake of Capitol Hill’s events have generated intense debate, especially from within the tech community. But many of the loudest voices have shown little understanding of the nuance of the situation or the historical context of actions taken by various platforms…

…Jillian York of the Electronic Frontier Foundation helpfully explains that Twitter, Facebook, Apple, Amazon, and others have previously taken similar actions — they just didn’t involve an outgoing U.S. president…

My own opinion is that this collision of politics, society, and technology has been a long time coming…My argument has been that these social platforms are essentially nation-states and require a higher level of social and civic etiquette established and enforced through official policies. When evaluating the performance of Twitter, Facebook, and others on this particular score, the phrase I have often used is “dereliction of duty.”…Today’s companies are responsible and accountable for recognizing the challenges and impact of scale — not just the pursuit of profit…

…Peter Singer…rightly points out that the recent headline-generating steps taken to foster a safer environment — both online and off — are long overdue. “They are not just tech creators or even the equivalent of news-media editors. After years of dodging it, they get that they are running information warzones,” Singer writes. They being social media giants like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Singer’s framing of the social platform as a battlefield is particularly important for thinking about the future. In his assessment of the seriousness of the events of last week for The New York Times, Yale professor Timothy Snyder wrote, “Post-truth is pre-fascism.” Whether we participate on the platforms or not, we will all suffer the ultimate cost of lies.

To read the complete article undamaged by my blogulous editing, click the link at Om’s name up top.

Hasenhuttl>Klopp

Southampton coach Ralph Hasenhuttl drops to his knees in tears after a critical victory over English Premier League top of the table Liverpool. Hasenhuttl, an Austrian, has never before defeated the famous German coach of Liverpool, Jurgen Klopp.

Southampton, now 6th place in the league, are only 4 points behind leaders Liverpool.

You don’t have to be a “hard man” all the time.

A visual reinterpretation of self

By OM MALIK

As someone who lives in the grays, I immensely appreciate a cold rainy weekend in San Francisco. This morning, I made myself a nice cup of tea and sat down on the writing table with my iPad, hoping to spend time reading some articles and catching up on books that have slowly started to pile up on the bed-stand. For some odd reason, I began to look at some of my older photos. I had edited them over the past twelve months.

As I flipped through the gigantic photoshop files, it felt as if I was looking at the work of someone else. I felt assaulted by the colors — even though I had stripped out the extraneous as much as I could. It is not as if I don’t enjoy a beautiful sunset or a glorious sunrise. It is not that I don’t enjoy the pinks, mauve, and gentle oranges over the breaking waves of the Pacific. However, when it comes to the visual interpretation of these same landscapes, I can’t help wrinkling my proverbial nose as if the color was a piece of rotting vegetation?

How did I end up here? Why? I often ask myself.

I always enjoy Om’s musings. Whether the topic is writing about the technical machinery that seems to be cranking full speed in his neck of the prairie…or photography…he’s just about always addressing something of interest to me.

I’m not the dedicated photographer I have been in decades past; but, my interest has never waned. Om’s style and commentary always finds the heart of whatever values he examines.